The Dim-Post

November 13, 2009

Friday lazy-ass link blogging.

Filed under: general idiocy,music — danylmc @ 6:02 am

My favorite comics author steps up to defend Ayn Rand. Vanity Fair makes fun of Malcolm Gladwell. The decade ain’t over yet but my pick for best song is Idioteque. It’s not my favorite song but I think they really nailed the zeitgeist:

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16 Comments »

  1. True dat Rand never explicitly preached force, but ask PC or Perigo about the war in Iraq and you’ll learn how great it is (except for the fact that some buildings were left standing) and Piekof, who kind of runs the cult these days, wants to nuke Iran. Itchy trigger-fingers those Randists have – metaphorically of course, you’d never catch any of them doing any of the actual fighting. That’s for poor people.

    For zeitgeist capturing you can’t go past Radiohead, but I like Babe I’m on Fire by Nick Cave.

    Comment by Guy Smiley — November 13, 2009 @ 6:16 am

  2. Bagge is your “favourite comics author”? Then you’d probably be aware that he’s had the regular libertarian rag gig for some time. Unfortunately, compared to his genuinely funny Buddy Bradley/Hate-era stuff, these days his work is about as heartfelt as fellow-lib Melanie Safka’s music. Even in his heyday I find it hard to imagine him being anyone’s favourite. While the lines his characters delivered showed that he had a great ear, compared to the likes of Crumb, Clowes, Spiegelman, Burns, and a whole host of lesser American lights, his visuals were pretty so-so.

    He’s a non-quitter who was desperate for a regular paid gig. Pity.

    Comment by joe W — November 13, 2009 @ 6:34 am

  3. these days his work is about as heartfelt as fellow-lib Melanie Safka’s music

    I really liked ‘Apocalypse Nerd’.

    Comment by danylmc — November 13, 2009 @ 6:55 am

  4. I really liked ‘Apocalypse Nerd’.
    I, uh, see what you mean.
    In light of that, it’s more than a little cringey to see him take on the pot-boiler lib gig. That audience would be unlikely to appreciate Founding Fathers Funnies. Would he do it for Jesus? I love his stuff enough to be disturbed by the possibility that he just might.

    Comment by joe W — November 13, 2009 @ 7:07 am

  5. “He’s a non-quitter who was desperate for a regular paid gig. Pity.”

    funnily enough his bio image says exactly that :-)

    http://reason.com/people/peter-bagge/all

    Comment by fraser — November 13, 2009 @ 7:37 am

  6. A song from 2000…? By zeitgeist do you mean the lyrics/message or musically (or both)?

    Comment by Sam — November 13, 2009 @ 7:48 am

  7. idioteque…..correct. When they perform this live the sense of urgency, paranoia, panic and fear is palpable. Thom gets his head a wobbling and the bass makes you feel a bit odd, love it.

    Comment by philonz — November 13, 2009 @ 8:25 am

  8. Have Radiohead rescinded their pledge never to fly abroad to play a gig because of the carbon discharge?

    They’re top of my bands-on-the-planet-I-haven’t-seen-and-most-want-to-see-but-don’t-know-when-or-where-that-is-going-to-happen-list.

    Comment by Conor Roberts — November 13, 2009 @ 8:55 am

  9. It’s not my favorite song but I think they really nailed the zeitgeist:

    What zeitgeist!? I assumed it came out after 9/11, but nope, the year before! Were things so bad or have Radiohead always been able to find inspiration for ‘apocalyptic’ lyrics without even trying?

    Comment by StephenR — November 13, 2009 @ 9:02 am

  10. Perhaps they were being prophetic… which gives them even more kudos re the zeitgeist. However, I suspect that their particular brand of ‘apocalypticism’ goes much further than that felt by the general ‘human spirit’, if such a thing could be said to exist.

    I had the good fortune to see them play at the Wellington Events Centre in ’98. Best concert I’ve ever attended, goes without saying really…

    Comment by Sam — November 13, 2009 @ 9:17 am

  11. Had you already read the pitchfork top albums of the ’00s, danyl? Kid A was no. 1

    Comment by Chris — November 13, 2009 @ 9:26 am

  12. The decade ain’t over yet but my pick for best song is Idioteque.

    Too early? Probably not.

    The AV Club (whoever they are) has just named the top 30 TV series of the decade (and other lists and the top 30 episodes of shows not on the top 30 series list). Interesting – and a lot more useful than a top 30 of all time list [which is better Here's Lucy or The Amazing Race].

    http://www.avclub.com/channels/best-of-the-decade/

    Music and other things (AV-related, one assumes) are being rolled out over the course of November.

    Comment by Graeme Edgeler — November 13, 2009 @ 11:14 am

  13. Oh so no-one give a fuck about the Beautiful People taking the piss out of a nerd? Oh yes it’s funny, I agree , if you’re 14! We can do the same with lots of other people who do nerdy things (c’mon Danyl, alternative universes and the LHC?).

    Go play with yourselves Vanity Fair, Malcolm Gladwell is far more useful to the world than you will ever be.

    (Not a fan-boy, just a nerd defender, because nobody else will).

    Comment by John — November 13, 2009 @ 11:44 am

  14. Live, in HD beauty. You will have to see Thom Yorke dancing like a muppet however.

    The entire Saitama concert is well worth watching.

    Comment by George Darroch — November 13, 2009 @ 12:45 pm

  15. Go play with yourselves Vanity Fair, Malcolm Gladwell is far more useful to the world than you will ever be.

    Weirdly enough Vanity Fair has had really good articles on the financial crisis. I’ve been meaning to blog about this for a while:
    http://www.vanityfair.com/business/features/2009/11/too-big-to-fail-excerpt-200911

    Had you already read the pitchfork top albums of the ’00s, danyl? Kid A was no. 1

    I haven’t seen that – I guess everyone will name Kid A their number 1 (I’m guessing Kala and College Dropout will also be up there); like most everybody else I was unimpressed with Kid A first time I heard it – nowhere near as good as OK Computer! – and it was only when the songs kept coming up on the iPod random shuffle that it won me over.

    Comment by danylmc — November 13, 2009 @ 12:51 pm

  16. Danyl, that Vanity Fair excerpt of “Too Big To Fail” by Andrew Ross Sorkin was strange. It’s style and detailing reminded me of “American Psycho” by Bret Ellis.
    I don’t know what connections Sorkin had to base that piece of on.
    All those bankers thinking of themselves as deeply moral, while regarding each other as scumbags (such is the morality of self-interest). Their tireless patriotism and duty to their stock-holders… What bullshit.
    It’s like J P Morgan and his cronies during the Panic of 1907, all over again.

    Comment by Adhominem — November 15, 2009 @ 9:22 am


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