The Dim-Post

January 27, 2010

Top men

Filed under: Politics — danylmc @ 11:07 am

This might work:

Labour MP Shane Jones has begun the year vowing to drive the Maori Party out of Parliament, saying they had betrayed their own people and lured the Government into funding their policies of “buying favours by giving money to a favoured few”.

The criticism following Labour’s first caucus of the year yesterday was a clear sign that the gentle approach Labour has thus far taken to the smaller party is over.

Seems to me that the Maori Party were doing an excellent job tearing themselves apart on their own (with a little help from National and ACT) and that Jones is only going to hamper that process. But this is a better way to win back Maori voters than having your Pakeha party leader attacking the MP in front of a grey-power meeting, so there’s some improvement there.

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14 Comments »

  1. This would be Shane Jones that won’t even dare stand in a Maori electorate but instead gets himself beaten by thousands of votes in Northland. How exactly have the Maori Party betrayed their own people? And what policies have Maori Party been lured into that gives money to just a few.

    Shane Jones is an idiot. The more he opens his mouth the worse he looks. The guy is unelectable and will only do more harm to Labour.

    Comment by gingercrush — January 27, 2010 @ 11:48 am

  2. “buying favours by giving money to a favoured few”

    Privileged Maori Elites vs Ordinary Kiwis.

    Labour hasn’t been very keen to give concrete examples of these elites that those mouth pieces for the elites Sharles and Turia, of all people, are supposedly shilling for.

    Comment by Neil — January 27, 2010 @ 11:58 am

  3. If Jones wants to be Labour leader he needs to contest (and win) a general electorate.

    Comment by danylmc — January 27, 2010 @ 12:02 pm

  4. And what policies have Maori Party been lured into that gives money to just a few.

    and

    Labour hasn’t been very keen to give concrete examples of these elites that those mouth pieces for the elites Sharles and Turia, of all people, are supposedly shilling for.

    This was the language they were using over the ETS, so probably all that business of giving a few breaks to Iwis then, no?

    Comment by StephenR — January 27, 2010 @ 12:07 pm

  5. If Jones wants to be Labour leader he needs to contest (and win) a general electorate.

    Although, hell, Brash was a list MP. So maybe not.

    Comment by danylmc — January 27, 2010 @ 12:16 pm

  6. Even today, Brash would make a better leader of the Labour Party than Jones.

    Comment by Phil — January 27, 2010 @ 12:42 pm

  7. “so probably all that business of giving a few breaks to Iwis then, no?”

    well Labour never get even that specific. The use the term “elites”, not iwi.

    but if iwi trusts getting a break over forestry – money that goes into things like educational scholarships – and less well off households getting extra money for insulation is what Labour means by Maori elites ripping off ordinary kiwis then Labour have sunk to a new low.

    I know of several insatnces where settlement money has been used to inapproriately benefit immediate family members. But it happened under Labour and my guess is they vote Labour. It’s a risk when daling with families which is how the Treaty process has to work.

    But the ‘elite’ qualifier is just a cover for appealing to the red neck vote.

    Shane Jones – didn’t he play a major part in divi-ing up the fishing industry – dealing out all those resources to Maori elites who all of a sudden have become so greedy.

    Comment by Neil — January 27, 2010 @ 12:49 pm

  8. well Labour never get even that specific. The use the term “elites”, not iwi.

    I’m fairly sure they did make the connection after the announcement of those measures.

    – money that goes into things like educational scholarships –

    Maybe it does, maybe it doesn’t – who knows?!

    But the ‘elite’ qualifier is just a cover for appealing to the red neck vote.

    It seem to appeal to ‘ordinary maori’ at the same time IMHO.

    Comment by StephenR — January 27, 2010 @ 1:32 pm

  9. Although, hell, Brash was a list MP. So maybe not.

    Perhaps he should try for reserve bank governor first.

    Comment by Zoo Neeland — January 27, 2010 @ 3:28 pm

  10. “Maybe it does, maybe it doesn’t – who knows?!”

    I can only speak from my own experience as I don’t have any figures, the trusts set up to handle treaty settlement assets are used to provide scholarships and other sorts getting-ahead initiatives. As I said, i know of instances where there is mis-use but I can’t see how it has anything to do with the MP.

    Labour were involved in a substantial way in developing of what are now generally sucessful iwi-based business and social iniatives that are based on teaty settlement resources. When in government they had no problem with what ever “elites” were created. Now it suits them to conjure up these demons.

    Pita Sharples spent most of his adult life working in poor urban settings. Shane Jones was in the boardrooms doing the deals. Elites indeed.

    Comment by Neil — January 27, 2010 @ 4:32 pm

  11. This might work:

    Ah yes, the former chairman of the Waitangi Fisheries Commission being the designated caucus brown-neck/populist rager has worked brilliantly so far. You know something, down at the flaxroots “arrogant”, “patronising” and “entitled little wanker” are description of Jones I hear too often for Goff’s comfort.

    Comment by Craig Ranapia — January 27, 2010 @ 5:41 pm

  12. Funny isn’t it, that the man with very little ‘Political Experience’ seems to be doing quite well at navigating the waters of a first term in power with a relatively young & inexperienced team during a recession whereas the “Dream Team” of experienced career pollies is scrabbling on the Whare floor for the Maori Parties scraps.

    Comment by Minty — January 28, 2010 @ 6:29 am

  13. Does the ‘Dream Team’ exist outside of people’s dreams?

    Comment by StephenR — January 28, 2010 @ 7:16 am

  14. …the trusts set up to handle treaty settlement assets are used to provide scholarships and other sorts getting-ahead initiatives.

    I’m well aware that is *one* thing they do – would be interesting to see a bit more info about this – whether investment in scholarship etc is systematic or not. Ngai Tahu unfortunately have fairly corporate website which doesn’t say much at all.

    Comment by StephenR — January 28, 2010 @ 7:20 am


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