The Dim-Post

April 29, 2010

Serious Question

Filed under: drugs — danylmc @ 7:53 am

Does anyone know what the popularity and subsequent outlawing of BZP based party pills had on youth drinking patterns and outcomes?

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14 Comments »

  1. Data sets usually take some years to become available. BZP was only banned in 2008. It may be too soon to tell.

    Comment by Will de Cleene — April 29, 2010 @ 8:34 am

  2. BZP typically allowed people who otherwise are not drug takers to stay out and drink longer. Most clubbers hated the stuff and hated the fact the drinkers – who used to be gone by 3am – hung around until the end of the night annoying girls, picking fights and generally making a nuisance of themselves.

    Since the BZP ban the young ‘uns get just as pissed, but they pass out earlier.

    Comment by Sanctuary — April 29, 2010 @ 8:35 am

  3. Yoofs kept on drinking, fighting, rooting and taking drugs. Oh and being hoons in cars while doing all of the previous..is there a moral panic I have missed?

    Thank god they won’t be able to afford cigarettes.

    Comment by andy (the other one) — April 29, 2010 @ 9:04 am

  4. As far as I knew, a lot of people who were taking party pills have switched to E, since if you’re going to take something illegal it may as well be good.

    Comment by Helenalex — April 29, 2010 @ 9:32 am

  5. i hated party pills. e was always way more fun. party pills gave the WORST hangovers. ever. my friends thought the same

    Comment by somewhatthoughtful — April 29, 2010 @ 11:03 am

  6. Sanctuary – load of bollocks.

    Personally not a fan of BZP, feel like train has run over you the next day, but you dont feel like drinking on the stuff after taking, just doesnt go down well. Further events where alcohol is not the main drug but alternatives (legal and elsewise) never have fights at them, cant say the same for alcohol.

    But I would imagine Helenalex got it spot on, those who used BZP drinking habbits would not of changed, just more likely to pop a couple more of the letter E (or what ever they put in the little tab – just as likely BZP these days ha).

    Comment by Jeff R — April 29, 2010 @ 11:06 am

  7. Although I do admit maybe my perceptions are jaded through where I go, places like the Waterfront in Aucks just hold no attraction to me..

    Comment by Jeff R — April 29, 2010 @ 11:08 am

  8. Since reclassifying of BZP, There is now a black market for it. It is still available if you know where to look.

    For the most part, drinking + BZP = bad times (depending on quantity of course) It was always one or the other.

    There are BZP-Free alternatives to BZP that work just as well (if not better), minus the trainwreck the next day.
    You still shouldn’t drink on these either.

    — So to not really answer the question, I doubt much has changed at all on both drinking and party pill fronts.

    I have also noticed a small proliferation of muppets peddling MDMA powder since BZP was banned. God only knows what they cut that with. (which is of course, another side-effect of prohibition over regulation)

    I imagine OP can get his results best by talking with a public nurse.

    Comment by Steveo — April 29, 2010 @ 11:50 am

  9. Yoofs kept on drinking, fighting, rooting and taking drugs. Oh and being hoons in cars while doing all of the previous..is there a moral panic I have missed?

    New Zealand (mostly) avoids moral panics about yoofsex.

    Comment by George D — April 29, 2010 @ 12:08 pm

  10. As far as I knew, a lot of people who were taking party pills have switched to E, since if you’re going to take something illegal it may as well be good.

    Supply affects price, which affects demand. It’s that simple.

    After the moral panics of the late 1990s and early 2000s, they started cracking down very seriously on ecstasy imports. The market (suppliers and consumers) looked for something else, and methamphetamine use increased as a result. Although that market was still rather small, it gave the foothold needed for the gangs to treat it as a core product rather than the fringe product it has previously been treated as. The tragic results are evident.

    Comment by George D — April 29, 2010 @ 12:13 pm

  11. “New Zealand (mostly) avoids moral panics about yoofsex.”
    Comment by George D — April 29, 2010 @ 12:08 pm

    Unless, of course, yoofsex results in pregnant teenage girls going on the DPB…

    Comment by MollyByGolly — April 29, 2010 @ 2:23 pm

  12. I don’t know about drinking patterns but sheep-dip blood levels have dropped dramatically in teenagers.

    Comment by MacDoctor — April 29, 2010 @ 4:20 pm

  13. ‘Supply affects price, which affects demand. It’s that simple.’

    Well, there’s always the quality and type of experience. I always preferred E to P because E makes you happy whereas P just makes it impossible to sit still. To use a sporting analogy, a rugby fan won’t suddenly start going to the tennis just because the tickets are cheaper.

    Some people preferred party pills to E because the experience was broadly similar, and the inferior quality was balanced by the lower price and becuase they weren’t illegal. Once party pills became illegal the only benefit was (presumably) the price, which for most people wouldn’t be enough to justify the horrendous comedown.

    Comment by Helenalex — April 30, 2010 @ 12:58 pm

  14. Actually, there was a study done:

    https://www.fmhs.auckland.ac.nz/_docs/staff/janie_sheridan_web_survey.pdf

    “The survey, which was conducted in mid and late 2008, explored the impact of banning BZP-party pills has had on people’s use of other substances.”

    Comment by kris_b — May 3, 2010 @ 3:56 pm


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