The Dim-Post

August 31, 2010

The Real World

Filed under: education — danylmc @ 6:42 am

Via Stuff:

Secondary teachers’ plans to strike next month show “how disconnected they are from the real world”, Prime Minister John Key says.

Hundreds of secondary schools will be closed on September 15 as teachers strike for the first time in eight years.

Plans are also in place for rolling strikes later in the year and teachers could boycott after-school meetings if they run too late.

Often when a public figure sternly lectures teachers about how they live in a fantasy world a teacher at some low-decile public school is stabbed by a student shortly afterwards. Hopefully that won’t happen this time around. I wonder if this ‘teachers don’t live in the real world’ trope is connected with people who send their children to private schools – they visit them on parent teacher nights, see all the nice buildings and beautiful grounds and hear about all the extremely well-funded extra-curricular activities and think: ‘This seems like a great place to work! How dare they keep striking and asking for more money!’ In contrast I think about my friends who teach at low decile schools who have students who self-harm by mutilating their faces, or who present ‘discipline problems’ because they’re members of a gang and it might be dangerous to punish them. That seems quite a lot more ‘real’ than any place I’ve ever worked.

About these ads

30 Comments »

  1. I think John Key making pronouncements about life in the ‘real world’ are ludicrous. He has been safely out of what most of us would describe as a ‘real world’ experience since he logged his first million in NY. Not for him, the ‘real world’ decisions about ehther to go into more credit-card debt in order to avoid penalties for paying the rates late, or how to save for the kids’ Christmas presents – for him, the majority of his ‘real-world’ choices revolve around which brand of bottled water he might try next.

    Comment by Monkey Boy — August 31, 2010 @ 6:51 am

  2. My understanding is that part of the teacher’s concerns are around the fact that the Ministry of Education wants to change their contracts and give them less non-contact hours for every hour they spend teaching. This is quite tough given that teachers are already not paid for either doing duty (you know, wandering around at lunchtime and playtime making sure the wee dears aren’t smoking/fighting/dead etc) or form time as “contact hours”. And then, of course, there is the marking, the class preparation, the team sports on Saturday morning etc etc

    Comment by LucyJH — August 31, 2010 @ 7:17 am

  3. It’s an entirely understandable view. For Key, the “real world” is one in which people earning hundreds of thousands a year vote themselves tax cuts, before nipping off for a nice vacation in their Hawaiian holiday home with a retinue of servants. Of course teachers are “disconnected” from this, how could it be otherwise?

    Comment by Psycho Milt — August 31, 2010 @ 7:26 am

  4. 4% demanded pay rise. 4% in a recession. Striking at the first chance once Labour is out.

    Comment by dribble — August 31, 2010 @ 7:46 am

  5. I also note that in the ‘real world’ Mr Key inhabits, the ladies stay at home and look after the kids. Teachers are made up of lots of ladies, ladies are supposed to stay at home, teachers who are ladies are disconnected (the rest of the teachers grouping must be teh Gays who are only to be danced with on an annual basis for electioneering)…

    If they just joined the real world and were more competitive about mat time and singing, the world would have more rainbows and the wage gap with Australia would close.

    Comment by andy (the other one) — August 31, 2010 @ 7:52 am

  6. “4% in a recession.”

    What we’re still in a recession? Really? It’s been two years of Tory miracle economic management. How can we still be in recession?

    Comment by Guy Smiley — August 31, 2010 @ 7:52 am

  7. Speaking of the disconnected. Hi Guy, don’t forget your medication you know how those Tories cause you to go purrple.

    Comment by dribble — August 31, 2010 @ 8:01 am

  8. Lolasaurus dribble. How’s the recession we’re not in treating you? Cruelly I’m betting.

    Comment by Guy Smiley — August 31, 2010 @ 8:08 am

  9. Umm yes you are disconnected, the recession ended a while back

    Comment by garethw — August 31, 2010 @ 8:08 am

  10. dribble: The news made it sound like 4% over two years, ie 2% per year.
    Considerably less than the rate of inflation even. Man, teachers are a greedy burden on the taxpayer.

    Comment by Simon Poole — August 31, 2010 @ 8:12 am

  11. I haven’t seen a wild lolasaurus 4 eva!

    Bless.

    Comment by Sanctuary — August 31, 2010 @ 8:24 am

  12. snort snort, just go and see how well the real economy is picking up outside of the beltway ladies.

    Comment by dribble — August 31, 2010 @ 8:33 am

  13. Haven’t y’all realised yet that attacking Key for being rich and aloof is like pissing in the wind?

    Comment by gazzaj — August 31, 2010 @ 8:37 am

  14. haven’t y’all realised that striking because you can’t get 4% wage increases while all other public sector workers have had about 1.5% is fucking retarded?

    Comment by dribble — August 31, 2010 @ 9:01 am

  15. The real world is that the rest of the country has been accepting just over 1% annual increases, and maybe most of these employees need an increase a hell of a lot more than the teachers.

    And even America’s most progressive President is demanding much greater teacher accountability.

    Key’s comment is right.

    JC

    Comment by JC — August 31, 2010 @ 9:11 am

  16. And of course in the “real world”, nurses, police and firefighters didn’t receive any sort of increases like that because they don’t face such dangers obviously.

    And yes that was of course tongue in cheek and sarcastic. Meant to be. NO ONE else is getting any sort of increase like what the teachers want, and many of those out in the “real world” face such dangers every day.

    Comment by David in Chch — August 31, 2010 @ 9:25 am

  17. For a start if the median Labour cost index is 3.3% all other workers can’t have had 1.5%. Dribble needs to look up the word median in a dictionary. And the claim that secondary teachers are striking because Labour is out of office shows how far the aptly-named Dribble is from the “real world”. In 2002-2003 secondary teachers engaged in the most protracted industrial struggle they have ever had and who was in government then Dribble? The result was the establishment of a salary adjustment mechanism – a suggestion from a minsterial taskforce chaired by Dame Margaret Bazley – to keep salaries current and avoid the situation where salaries fall so behind, a massive fight is requred to get them back to a level where it’s possible to recruit and retain teachers. Thus – no strikes for 6 years. Then John Key and Bill English come along and dump on the cooperative process because they are looking for fight. They might find that they have bitten off more than they can chew.

    Comment by Bronwyn — August 31, 2010 @ 9:33 am

  18. On a related note, the nurses are striking in Auckland torturing babies, according to the front page of today’s Herald.

    Makes Key’s comments about teachers seem like a compliment :-)

    Comment by gazzaj — August 31, 2010 @ 9:39 am

  19. The teachers salary adjustment mechanism is designed to keep salaries current and currently most New Zealanders are NOT getting a 4% salary increase.

    The 3.3% median Labour cost (for teachers) shows that teachers are already getting salary increases much higher than the countries median of 1.6%.

    In fact it is of much note that the public sector median is 2.1% while private sector median is 1.4%.

    And it is worth highlighting that the 3.3% median increase in education salaries is the highest such increase across all industry sectors in New Zealand for the year ending June 2010.

    http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/prices_indexes/LabourCostIndexSalaryandWageRates_HOTPJun10qtr.aspx

    Comment by dribble — August 31, 2010 @ 10:05 am

  20. Often when a public figure sternly lectures teachers about how they live in a fantasy world a teacher at some low-decile public school is stabbed by a student shortly afterwards. Hopefully that won’t happen this time around.

    That only makes it a fantasy world if the student is an orc.

    Comment by Idiot/Savant — August 31, 2010 @ 11:15 am

  21. Dead Prez said it in ‘Hip Hop’: “Whether your project’s put on hold in the real world, these just people with ideas. They just like you and me when the smoke and camera disappear. Again the real world, it’s bigger than all these fake ass records.”

    What does this have to do with the proposed strike and Mr Key’s “down with the people” response? Little, alas. But if you’re feeling somewhat distressed by the news that our PM is talking “quite frankly” you could do worse than drink a few coffees and listen to the Diplo remix of Hip Hop. That’ll get you in the mood for some real-shit indignation.

    Comment by McRad — August 31, 2010 @ 11:21 am

  22. I just laughed when I saw the Union ads in the newspaper asking for a wage increase. The duplictious way it used statistics instead of actual figures to demonstrate how they were ‘underpaid’ was simply a means to avoid having to say to the public that their starting salaries are close to the average salary in NZ.

    Comment by JD — August 31, 2010 @ 2:08 pm

  23. I’d much rather pay them what they want and have them enjoy teaching my crotch fruit than striking all the time. FYI

    Comment by Rangi — August 31, 2010 @ 2:45 pm

  24. Actually here is another excerpt from the real world:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/brown-returns-to-politics-with-a-plea-for-faminestricken-niger-2066143.html

    So while another group of public servants with safe jobs have their hand out…

    Comment by JD — August 31, 2010 @ 4:27 pm

  25. What is not being mentioned is the fact that the government is more interested in changing the working conditions within schools. This means that there will be no more recommended class sizes. This isn’t all about money, it is actually about education.

    As for international examples: New South Wales teachers are getting 4%, in the UK (where the recession is really biting) teachers are getting more than 3%, yet teachers in New Zealand are some of the lowest paid in the OECD.

    Comment by Tim — August 31, 2010 @ 5:14 pm

  26. No more recommended class sizes Tim? Can you please elaborate on this perhaps with some references.

    Comment by dribble — August 31, 2010 @ 6:30 pm

  27. “yet teachers in New Zealand are some of the lowest paid in the OECD.”
    Crikey, brother: we ALL be the lowest paid “whatever” in the OECD. Um, except for our MP salaries, it seems.

    Comment by Clunking Fist — August 31, 2010 @ 6:55 pm

  28. In 2002-2003 secondary teachers engaged in the most protracted industrial struggle they have ever had and who was in government then

    Oh, let me guess! Was it National? It must have been, because everybody knows that no union would ever go on strike under a socialist Labour government (the unions and Labour are pretty much the same thing, right?).

    In fact it is of much note that the public sector median is 2.1% while private sector median is 1.4%

    Is the PPTA asking for 4% over one year, or over two? The government’s offer is for an increase this year, and then an increase next year, so I’m not sure. If it’s over two years, then that’s in line with the rest of the public sector.

    Comment by derp de derp — August 31, 2010 @ 7:55 pm

  29. “As for international examples: New South Wales teachers are getting 4%, in the UK (where the recession is really biting) teachers are getting more than 3%, yet teachers in New Zealand are some of the lowest paid in the OECD.”
    Comment by Tim — August 31, 2010 @ 5:14 pm

    As someone else noted, NZ has some of the lowest salaries in the OECD, using ONLY an absolute scale. However, in _relative_ terms, we are about on a par. Whenever I am in Aus, I cannot believe the high food prices, and housing in Sydney … forget it.

    Similarly in Canadian major cities, housing is outrageously expensive. I just returned from a sudden trip there. And when you combine the federal income tax, the provincial income tax (many people who have been doing comparisons on some of these blogs forget that), and municipal taxes (which there fund schools), then often it isn’t until near the middle of the tax year that you are working for yourself.

    Comment by David in Chch — August 31, 2010 @ 10:16 pm

  30. When was the last time John Key was in the real world?

    Comment by peterlepaysan — September 1, 2010 @ 7:49 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Rubric Theme Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 336 other followers

%d bloggers like this: