The Dim-Post

May 30, 2011

Everything you ever needed to know about politics summed up in a single sentence

Filed under: polls — danylmc @ 9:34 am

From another story by Audrey Young summarising Herald Digipoll results, this one regarding voter support for raising the retirement age:

A breakdown of the 52.3 per cent of respondents who think the issue should be addressed now shows greater support for the proposition among younger voters, aged 18 to 39, and those aged 65 or over who are already receiving the pension.

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15 Comments »

  1. If I may add a supporting second sentence: “The vast majority of political leaders are aged 39-65″

    Comment by garethw — May 30, 2011 @ 10:04 am

  2. If I may add a supporting second sentence: “The vast majority of political leaders are aged 39-65″

    No shit Sherlock. But why would they care given their own generous Parliamentary superannuation arrangements?

    Comment by TerryB — May 30, 2011 @ 11:10 am

  3. The youngest baby boomers are 47-48; The oldest are turning 65 this year. The never-fucking wrong generation is certain of it’s right to be fully funded by everyone else into a long and comfortable retirement.

    Comment by Sanctuary — May 30, 2011 @ 11:19 am

  4. “The never fucking wrong generation”

    That’s great, Sanctuary. Never heard it before. Must tell the teenagers who assume a monopoly on wisdom in this house

    Comment by Tinakori — May 30, 2011 @ 1:05 pm

  5. The never-fucking wrong generation is certain of it’s right to be fully funded by everyone else into a long and comfortable retirement

    To be fair shouldn’t that barb be aimed at those who voted for Muldoon in 1975? Not too many of Generation NFW would have been eligible to vote then?

    Comment by TerryB — May 30, 2011 @ 1:10 pm

  6. TerryB: depends on how you define Boomers – US Census Bureau thinks 1946-1964 (wiki), which would mean that in ’75 a little over half of them would have been eligible to vote. Of course, that’s probably not enough to blame them for the whole election, but they certainly could have swung it if it had been close.

    Of course, if I remember correctly, Colin James notes at the start of the ’08 Levine/Roberts post-election book that ’08 had been the last election where Boomers were the largest percentage of voters, which means we can probably blame pretty much every election result between ’81 and ’08 on them.

    Comment by Simon Poole — May 30, 2011 @ 1:18 pm

  7. I’m young and I do NOT support it. This would hard on those who do manual labour or more physical jobs. Plus older citzens already have slim employment opportunities. I work in the health field and come across many 59-64 year olds who are very unhealthy and have low employment options. People, especially young people, need to have an open mind about this issue.

    Comment by K2 — May 30, 2011 @ 1:25 pm

  8. K2: that’s fine, but then we have to support increased taxation to pay for universal superannuation. The current situation is that Mr Key refuses to consider either changing the system or increasing its funding which is, frankly, irresponsible.

    Comment by Simon Poole — May 30, 2011 @ 1:28 pm

  9. The superannuation scheme was the product of the Muldoon cabinet and I doubt there was a baby-boomer among them, even in its third term. The boomers were most definitely not thinking about their retirements by then. That debate and the relevant decision-making would have been driven by people for whom the depression and the 2nd World War were first hand experiences. Governments dominated by boomers have actually reduced entitlements.

    Comment by Tinakori — May 30, 2011 @ 3:53 pm

  10. “…Governments dominated by boomers have actually reduced entitlements…”

    For everyone except themselves.

    Comment by Sanctuary — May 30, 2011 @ 5:08 pm

  11. No, for themselves as well

    Comment by Tinakori — May 30, 2011 @ 5:35 pm

  12. The whole problem of paying for pensions and all the other nice to have’s would be solved by raising NZ’s taxes which are among the lowest in the OECD. It’s been proven that high taxes don’t make a blind bit of difference to whether people work harder, start a business or move to a country.

    What motivates people to any of these choices is emotional responses to their environment – happiness, misery, confidence.

    We should consider the fact that cuts to govt spending creates hardship which creates misery – which is highly contagious – when making financial policy.

    Comment by Myles thomas — May 30, 2011 @ 8:11 pm

  13. No doubt you all think I’m nuts now.

    Comment by Myles thomas — May 30, 2011 @ 9:15 pm

  14. So, those so young they think retirement is aaages away, and those already getting theirs, think we should slash the pension for those about to get it soon? Hmmmm.

    I’m still well off pension age FWIW.

    @ Myles T – nope, I reckon you’re compassionate, which is a Good Thing. Can you pass some of that on to Mr Planker of Parnell?

    I for one look forward to our glorious capitalist overlords forcing us all into workcamps in our sunset years. I can smell the dust of the rocks I break now… maybe I can make a thin gruel of the rock dust with my sweat – see, tasty nutritious meals like what Paula Bennet taught me.

    Okay, now I sound nuts. Oh well.

    Comment by bob — May 31, 2011 @ 5:07 pm

  15. If the retirement age is going to be hiked, then at least a split or means-tested retirement age should be considered. Many blue-collar workers – and airline pilots on health & safety grounds – often aren’t in a position to work past retirement age like a white-collar worker can.

    Comment by DeepRed — May 31, 2011 @ 5:19 pm


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