The Dim-Post

November 27, 2011

Part one of a possibly-not-occasional series

Filed under: blogging,Politics — danylmc @ 10:19 am

Trevor Mallard blogs on Red Alert and asks for people to comment on Labour’s campaign. I don’t have a comment so much as a question: what the fuck is your social media strategy? What is Red Alert? Is it a way to communicate with the media? With the public? With your base? Or is it a way for your MPs to waste time playing around on the internet, occasionally embarrassing themselves and the party while pretending to do all of those other things?

 

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55 Comments »

  1. eh !!!…Should let Kris Faafoi run it.

    Isn’t he some trained media whizz spinmeister ex journo press sec blah blah blah with a propensity to indulge his youthful fantasies of being in places he never was ?

    Sounds perfect for the job of blitzing social media, running interference, upping the noise to signal ratio around the right wing blogoshere and generally making a nuisance of himself with cutting remarks and withering comebacks designed to shut down nutjob ideaolgy with impeccable soundbite logic the average man can buy into and echo around babylon-line.

    Surely he’s got be more of some use than just sheepishly following Goff around being the token jolly brown P.I guy in a suit nodding inanely in the background ? Not that he’s gonna have Goff to follow around for much longer.

    If it’s black to the future (or in our case brown) and Kris is representaive of that, then he needs to grow a pair, man up and lead from the front cos thats pretty much where he’s positioned now as a Pasifikan in a caucus with no Carmel Sepuloni or Kelvin Davis.

    If media is your thing Kris, then own it and your future !!!

    Comment by pollywog — November 27, 2011 @ 10:39 am

  2. My comment there

    As was said by Jon Johannson on Q and A this morning. Take three deep breaths. Have the summer break, then look at the leader. National is vulnerable in 2014, unless Labour can somehow snatch defeat from the claws of victory.
    Realise that massive change needs to occur, and have the cajones to do that.
    Realise that last night WAS a massive defeat and figure out why it happened.
    Finally. Don’t keep thinking Key is Satan incarnate. He is bad, but the public hate the negative politics. Come up with a viable alternative.
    Form a strong relationship with the Greens. You will need it.

    Comment by max — November 27, 2011 @ 10:40 am

  3. “Incumbent Labour MP Clare Curran had her majority slashed in the traditional Labour stronghold of Dunedin South and National pulled off an upset by winning the party vote in the working class electorate.”

    Comment by sheesh — November 27, 2011 @ 10:49 am

  4. What Max said and realise that spending our way out of a recession isn’t the answer, Labour need to cut-out the big spending policies, they need to start using words like ‘sensible’, ‘reasonable’ and ‘common sense’.

    National will struggle to win the 2014 campaign as voters will tire of Key (the media have already started to fall out of love with him) and we will still be running a deficit even though National insist their plan will balance the books. Labour do not have any automatic right to the non-National vote so they need to make themselves appeal again by having someone the public can imagine being PM and polices and a plan that make sense.

    Comment by ieuan — November 27, 2011 @ 10:51 am

  5. Cunliffe does not want everyone to take 3 deep breaths and wait till February. Bollocks to that. He knows his best chance is to strike now before anyone else gets some momentum behind them. He’ll be on the blower all day today drumming up support to make a move this week.

    Comment by Pat — November 27, 2011 @ 11:00 am

  6. it’s the economy stupid. Not the strategy:

    http://nowoccupy.blogspot.com/2011/11/perfect-storm.html

    Comment by Monique Watson (@Orcs2Elves) — November 27, 2011 @ 11:05 am

  7. Oh and Red Alert. I always thought this was simply a vanity vehicle for Mallard to exercise his secret fantasy of creating a a public groundswell of admiration for himself, to sweep him into leadership of the party.

    Plus it sure beats walking the streets and knocking on doors. That Nicki Kaye and Jacinda Ardern are sooooo last century!

    Comment by Pat — November 27, 2011 @ 11:08 am

  8. Whoa whoa, back on up there – Labour had a social media strategy?

    Comment by SHG — November 27, 2011 @ 11:12 am

  9. Didn’t realise that Carmel Sepuloni didn’t get back in on the list, like Shane Jones she’s another I never understood as being touted as a “star” .She’s comes across as no different to the likes of Chris Carter and the other Labour mps with a massive sense of entitlement and her rantings on Red Alert read more like some of the more feral postings on the Standard.

    As far as their campaign went, the $15 an hour minimum wage campaign was incredibly stupid, anyone who employs someone knows exactly how much that really means not only in terms of their employees weekly wage, but also their holiday pay and ACC.Labour love to demonise business but not every employer is a multinational tax dodging company and in a smaller owner operated business [like mine] those dollars come straight off your bottom line and you see them go out every week.

    Comment by Raumatibeach — November 27, 2011 @ 11:13 am

  10. Curran is a wannabe tryhard who simply doesn’t connect with the electorate. Her majority has shrunk in every election she has contested.
    If Labour want her…then the list should be her home. For a PR person, her postings on Red Alert have been confusing and sometimes outright embarrassing.
    Red Alert usually descends into sycophants v trolls pretty rapidly. It then becomes a side show.

    Comment by Peter Martin — November 27, 2011 @ 11:30 am

  11. well as I cant seem to comment on RA, I`ll comment here

    1. the party list was dreadful
    2. they didnt roll Goff in 2007
    3. Chauvel in Ohariu was negative and the candidate should have been someone else
    4. the focus on asset sales was wrong
    5. Agree with you on the social media strategy – they needed someone to manage it

    Comment by Dave — November 27, 2011 @ 11:36 am

  12. Red Alert’s biggest problem are commentors(ers?) like Tracey, Jennifer and Ghostwhowalks. Everything is the public’s fault for being too stupid, and no one should ever question anything Labour ever says. Those three have shouted down any semblance of debate on Red Alert so quickly that it becomes impossible to use as tool for getting feedback on policy. It’s the same “You’re just not smart enough to agree with us” born to rule entitlement that Curran seems to dish out in spades, except attempting to dress it up using PR phrases like “Stay on message”. Which she then doesn’t do. It’s all about walking the talk, and the Labour MPs posting on Red Alert still haven’t figured that out now. Time to clean house.

    Comment by DerpDerpington — November 27, 2011 @ 11:36 am

  13. Cunliffe does not want everyone to take 3 deep breaths and wait till February.

    Yep. The longer he waits, the more time there is for a dark horse like Robertson or Little to gather numbers.

    It’s in the interest of the Labour Party to spend time discussing the leadership change — maybe even talking to their membership! — but that’s a different thing of course.

    Comment by bradluen — November 27, 2011 @ 11:45 am

  14. The campaign was fine (more than fine – it almost had me return to Labour). The previous 3 years were not.

    Comment by MeToo — November 27, 2011 @ 12:10 pm

  15. The main weakness of the campaign from my pov was the lack of “Party Vote Labour” billboards. All the ones around Auckland were for the local candidate. I asked a Labour insider at work; why? He replied it was the list – people like Carmel Sepuloni and Phil Twyford weren’t going to get in on the list as they were ranked too low. So they campaigned hard for their own survival in their electorates and the Party Vote campaign took a back seat. I see Phil won Te Atatu but National won the party vote. (But maybe that’s because no one like Tau.)

    Where is the turnout data?

    Comment by MeToo — November 27, 2011 @ 12:15 pm

  16. “— maybe even talking to their membership! —”

    well, everything else they’ve stolen from the greens so far has worked out pretty well for them…

    Comment by nommopilot — November 27, 2011 @ 12:21 pm

  17. Labour had their “Street Captains” in South Auckland to turn out the vote. What went wrong?

    Comment by Pat — November 27, 2011 @ 12:21 pm

  18. ‘The campaign’ is all-encompassing:

    It’s things like the campaign manager facing off in bike races against bloggers.
    It’s things like the senior list MPs dishing out vitriol to well-liked New Zealanders like the Mad Butcher (whose actions affect the party vote and those at the marginal end of the list, not their own seat).
    It’s things like saying you won’t run a campaign based on personal attacks, and then have posts on your website snarking about John Key.
    It’s things like opening a campaign ad talking about prices rising faster than incomes, but then not actually offering up a solution to the problem.
    It’s things like making ‘higher power prices’ part of your asset sales campaigns when your party milked those dividends and power prices almost doubled under your watch.
    It’s things like relying on those dividends when you earlier promised that there you wouldn’t use them because of the pressure it put on power prices.
    It’s things like running a campaign where your leader and a party vote suggestion don’t feature on billboards.
    It’s things like crowing about your PR expertise, and then just banning people who disagree with you from your main source of feedback, which you also crow about.
    It’s things like getting hung up on the volume of TV ads when you’re trying to deliver a message about things like CGT and a better minimum wage.
    It’s things like picking the same front bench that took on National in 1999.
    It’s things like picking a list that stops most of your fresh talent from getting in, let alone advancing.
    It’s things like spending more time brooding about and childishly insulting one of the most popular PMs we’ve ever had, instead of actively engaging him on policy.
    It’s things like refusing to discuss those policies in detail, as instructed by your campaign manager.

    I could go on, but in reality, if Labour want this soul searching to actually be meaningful, they’re going to have to be more honest with themselves than they’ve shown any inclination to be. And that means not just talking about those things up there, but everything that’s happened over the last three years and during this campaign.

    Comment by DerpDerpington — November 27, 2011 @ 12:26 pm

  19. All of the old timers like Trevor need to walk, soon, so that Labour can get the Nashes et al back in before they are lost forever to Labour.

    Fact. Trev and Co ARE the problem with Labour.

    Comment by will — November 27, 2011 @ 12:44 pm

  20. Derp- Engaging Key on policy- you’re having a laugh mate. Labour had a wide range of policies and the Nats had two- beneficiary bashing and asset sales. They had an education policy a day or two before the election. You can’t blame Labour for no one except the BBC asking Key tough questions. And for the British to be calling on us to release tapes that no one here had the guts to do. And the Ombudsmen…shocked and unsuprised at Mike Smith’s post on the standard. If the head of RNZ is Bolger’s ex-press secretary…

    Comment by sheesh — November 27, 2011 @ 12:48 pm

  21. The Nats ran plenty of personal attacks- it’s just that it was WhaleOil and Farrar that ran them, not the Nats own website.

    Comment by sheesh — November 27, 2011 @ 12:50 pm

  22. Pat: South Auckland was the only region in which Labour’s vote share increased.

    Comment by bradluen — November 27, 2011 @ 12:50 pm

  23. Sheesh – Sorry, but that excuse doesn’t wash. Goff didn’t know his debt policies, couldn’t tell interviewers how many years it took the CGT to return positive revenues, etc. You can’t expect to seriously engage someone on policies when they don’t know them. And it only took one line from Jerry MacQuire for John Key to instantly throw doubt on every single one of Labour’s spending plans. You can piss and moan about the media all you want, but the most well-thought out policies in the world can’t save a leader who doesn’t know them or a campaign that can’t explain how they’re paying for them (or stick to a line about whether they’re costed or not).

    Comment by DerpDerpington — November 27, 2011 @ 12:52 pm

  24. sheesh you make the mistake alot of us make because we follow the blogs. Whaleoil and kiwiblog really only have a following amongst those of us who are interested in politics so their attacks, while anoying some and delighting others of us don’t have a wide audience. The Labour attacks were done through the MSM which reaches everyone hence they were more damaging to Labour.

    Most of my firends look blankly at me when I mention these websites and I do not think I am unusual in that respect.

    You also make the mistake of thinking that those 2 are directed from party HQ. Quite the oposite infact.

    Comment by Charmaine. — November 27, 2011 @ 1:41 pm

  25. “Incumbent Labour MP Clare Curran had her majority slashed in the traditional Labour stronghold of Dunedin South and National pulled off an upset by winning the party vote in the working class electorate.”

    Shit IN Dunedin South! The working people must be truly deserting Labour if this report is true. Then again Labour response to Hillside workers being layed off was pretty poor. They had huge community support to mobilise but pretty gave measly words. Maybe had something also to do with Curran?

    Comment by K2 — November 27, 2011 @ 1:55 pm

  26. K2 wrote: “Shit IN Dunedin South! The working people must be truly deserting Labour if this report is true”

    indeed. it would be quite sensational if it were true.

    Dunedin South results:
    Labour 17,408
    National 12,742

    Comment by Kahikatea — November 27, 2011 @ 2:22 pm

  27. @Kahikatea Where’s those stats from?. I’ve looked on ODT site: says National won party vote.

    http://www.odt.co.nz/election-2011/-south/188188/final-result-dunedin-south

    Comment by K2 — November 27, 2011 @ 3:19 pm

  28. Dunedin South results here: http://www.electionresults.govt.nz/electionresults_2011/electorate-9.html

    Labour 11,429
    National 13,190

    CURRAN, Clare 15,759
    HAYES, Joanne 11,892

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — November 27, 2011 @ 4:21 pm

  29. It should also be of concern to Labour that Joanne Hayes was parachuted in for this election from Manawatu and has spent around six months in the electorate.Who knows what a more well known local could have achieved.

    Comment by Peter Martin — November 27, 2011 @ 4:40 pm

  30. I’d be happy to post on Red Alert and give Labour some advice…if I was allowed to. There’s the problem. Labour is selective who it chooses to hear from which means that it hears only what it wants to hear. Clare Curran and Trevor Mallard come across as arrogant. Having said that, I think too many commenters are hung up on Labour’s campaign. I said a while ago that Labour needed a minor miracle if they were going to win and it was pretty obvious that was never going to happen.

    Comment by Ross — November 27, 2011 @ 4:49 pm

  31. I’m a little bit confused about the ‘earthquake effect’. Mike Williams claimed most of the displaced Chch voters were Labour party supporters, which is mathematically true for an electorate like Chch-east, but doesn’t explain the Port Hills, which picks up a large swathe of written-off homes in more affluent suburbs like Cashmere, as well as less-damaged parts of the south of the city – Hoon Hay, Sydenham etc, where Ruth Dyson held on despite a huge hit to the party vote. .

    Comment by Phil — November 27, 2011 @ 5:24 pm

  32. Labour had their “Street Captains” in South Auckland to turn out the vote. What went wrong?

    Interestingly, in Ohariu my partner recieved a knock at our door while I was out playing cricket on Saturday afternoon – a friendly person wearing a bright red Labour Party rosette and a big smile ask if all the eligible voters had yet been to a polling place.

    Is this illegal?

    Comment by Phil — November 27, 2011 @ 5:29 pm

  33. Does a social mediaolicy even matter? Seriously, NZ First got almost 7% by campaigning the old fashioned way. Sure, the cub reporters that pass as journalists at the Herald interview Kiwiblog quite a lot but I think the number of libertarians and ACToids who infest the blogs (compared to their actual share of the vote) like some sort of online rash goes to show that really, almost all voters don’t give a stuff about online media policies.

    Comment by Sanctuary — November 27, 2011 @ 6:15 pm

  34. “I’d be happy to post on Red Alert and give Labour some advice…if I was allowed to.”

    Good point. My post didn’t get published

    Comment by max — November 27, 2011 @ 6:21 pm

  35. Sorry, should have looked under older comments. Ignore my last comment

    Comment by max — November 27, 2011 @ 6:22 pm

  36. Labour’s problem is that its new blood was slaughtered, its experienced hands will get the blame, and the middle-class, chardonnay-drinking, straight-from-uni, never-actually-worked-outside-Parliament, 25-35-year-old, just-waiting-till-they-can-wangle-a-decent-list slot coterie of advisors and researchers that have delivered every Labour fuck-up for the last three years will get away scot free.

    Comment by Trouble Man — November 27, 2011 @ 6:29 pm

  37. “@Kahikatea Where’s those stats from?. I’ve looked on ODT site: says National won party vote. ”

    oops. it looks like I accidentally quoted the 2008 results from electionresults.govt.nz.

    as you were…

    Comment by Kahikatea — November 27, 2011 @ 6:49 pm

  38. Knocking on doors with a Rosette and asking if the eligible voters have been to the polling booth is entirely legal.

    In fact I (a long time anarchist) ended up doing just that yesterday as it meant my partner would be done sooner.

    Comment by squirrel — November 27, 2011 @ 6:58 pm

  39. @Sanc

    Friday 25th @2.30ish radio live. Older Bloke rings in saying his Grand Daughter was hired to make comments, on blogs, under multiple names and IP addresses by the Nats. Just about crashed the car. Makes you question the signal to noise ratio of blogs.

    Comment by andy (the other one) — November 27, 2011 @ 7:03 pm

  40. “Knocking on doors with a Rosette and asking if the eligible voters have been to the polling booth is entirely legal. ”

    really? we were told it’s legal to ask, but illegal to wear a party rosette while doing so.

    Comment by Kahikatea — November 27, 2011 @ 7:07 pm

  41. “oops. it looks like I accidentally quoted the 2008 results from electionresults.govt.nz.”

    in my defence, this blog IS called the Dim Post.

    Comment by Kahikatea — November 27, 2011 @ 7:08 pm

  42. “Interestingly, in Ohariu my partner recieved a knock at our door while I was out playing cricket on Saturday afternoon – a friendly person wearing a bright red Labour Party rosette and a big smile ask if all the eligible voters had yet been to a polling place. ”

    No. Displaying party insignia by itself on election day is not illegal (cf an ad saying “vote for a party”) – that’s why scrutineers can wear them at the polling place. Asking if people have voted is not illegal (as long as it isn’t done with menaces, obviously!). Even offering to help people to the polling place is not illegal (so long as you don’t try to influence the voter on the way).

    I suspect you/your partner are of a demographic/live in an area that Labour thinks likely to support them. Hence the concern about your actions.

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — November 27, 2011 @ 7:10 pm

  43. Interesting party results across Dunedin. National strong, and Greens at 17% across both electorates.

    Total party votes (Dunedin North and Dunedin South combined):

    National: 21,466
    Labour: 20,292
    Greens: 10,142
    NZ First: 3,931

    http://yourdunedin.org/2011/11/27/dunedin-is-a-multi-party-city/

    Comment by Pete George — November 27, 2011 @ 7:11 pm

  44. “No. Displaying party insignia by itself on election day is not illegal (cf an ad saying “vote for a party”) …”

    Eeek! Quick clarification before Graeme Edgeler catches me … the Electoral Act 1993, s.197(1)(g) does say:

    “Every person commits an offence and shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding $20,000 who at an election—
    at any time on polling day before the close of the poll exhibits in or in view of any public place, or publishes, or distributes, or broadcasts,—

    (iv) any ribbons, streamers, rosettes, or items of a similar nature in party colours:”

    However, there is an exception for “ribbons, streamers, rosettes, or items of a similar nature, which are worn or displayed by any person (not being an electoral official) on his or her person or on any vehicle in party colours or to a party lapel badge worn by any person (not being an electoral official):”

    http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1993/0087/latest/DLM310065.html#DLM310065

    So … upshot is, it’s OK to wear a rosette on your person on election day – but you couldn’t stick one on a lamppost or similar.

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — November 27, 2011 @ 7:18 pm

  45. Red Alert is both an asset and a liability to Labour. On the one hand you can interact with them more directly than with the Nats who have nothing similar. On the other hand, the signal-to-noise ratio is only as good as the people posting to it, and any potential slip-up likely gets amplified, unlike party hack blogs like The Standard and Kiwiblog. As it stands, it seems to preach to the choir, and the presence of trolls isn’t helping either.

    And Red Alert doesn’t have a monopoly on ‘censorship’ – John Key’s Facebook page has been known to delete any posts asking ‘hard questions’.

    Comment by DeepRed — November 27, 2011 @ 7:34 pm

  46. “I said a while ago that Labour needed a minor miracle if they were going to win and it was pretty obvious that was never going to happen.”

    That’s true, but I think the criticisms are valid because, while it wasn’t reasonable to expect Labour to win without a massive game-changer, it was reasonable to expect them to increase their vote share. All other things being equal, governments tend to lose popularity while in office.

    Comment by Hugh — November 27, 2011 @ 8:17 pm

  47. John Key’s Facebook page has been known to delete any posts asking ‘hard questions’.

    John Key’s Facebook minders have been routinely ‘unfriending’ anyone who so mush as hints at polite discontent with the earthquake ‘recovery’ process.
    Just identifying yourself as living in any of the ‘zones’ is enough to have you out on your arse.

    Comment by Joe W — November 27, 2011 @ 9:27 pm

  48. agreed, Red Alert is another wasted opportunity.
    good idea, poorly executed with no coherent strategy.
    i agree too it appears most of all to be an excuse for Labour MPs to waste time on the net.

    Comment by the sprout — November 27, 2011 @ 10:51 pm

  49. I think Labour’s media strategy now is to use Red Alert to see who gets thrown under the bus first.

    Got to get popular and fast. No mandate for Labour’s failed policies this election.

    Comment by OECD rank 22 kiwi — November 28, 2011 @ 3:30 am

  50. The Dunedin results suggest that National supporters are voting for Clare Curran.

    Cunning bastards.

    Comment by helenalex — November 28, 2011 @ 9:27 am

  51. I suspect RA is all about Mallard using the interwebs to try and score a date with Cactus Kate.

    Comment by Gregor W — November 28, 2011 @ 10:22 am

  52. But Cactus isn’t married

    Comment by insider — November 28, 2011 @ 11:58 am

  53. I said at RA that as a campaign manager Trevor makes a good blogger racing road cyclist.

    it never got posted.

    And thats the problem right thurr.

    Comment by pollywog — November 28, 2011 @ 12:18 pm

  54. @ Charmaine they can go then from those blogs without having to come from the Nats direct to the media at large.

    Comment by sheesh — November 28, 2011 @ 5:42 pm


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