The Dim-Post

October 13, 2012

The kraken awakes

Filed under: general idiocy — danylmc @ 9:44 am

The Herald reports:

Copyright changes proposed by a member of the Green Party could destroy jobs and is “piss-taking” business, says Labour’s Shane Jones.

It is the latest swipe Jones has taken at the Greens after MP Gareth Hughes voiced support for a Greenpeace spoof of a Sealord television advertisement.

The mock advert – released online – was dubbed over a Sealord television commercial and criticised what Greenpeace believed were harmful fishing practices.

Jones, a former Sealord chairman, called it a step too far, and likened it to economic vandalism at a time when jobs were scarce.

Not content to let the issue die, Jones has now taken aim at changes to copyright law tabled by Hughes, calling them a vehicle for the “Green agenda” to continue “piss-taking” business.

Hughes’ amendments aim to widen the interpretation of existing laws in favour of those wishing to parody or satirise copyrighted work.

Hughes told the Weekend Herald that satire and parody were not covered under current laws and said the changes would bring New Zealand in line with other countries.

It’s nice to see that Shane Jones still takes a casual interest in New Zealand politics. Bit of a shame the only thing that motivates him is his passionate hatred of Labour’s largest viable coalition partner, and not, say, National Party policy. But after four years of total silence on all of his portfolio areas, his vehement opposition to a satirical ad parodying a company he used to chair, and that paid him $10,000 during the last election campaign is a deft way to remind us all what Jones stands for.

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20 Comments »

  1. “his vehement opposition to a satirical add”

    But you can’t take anything away from a good satirical add.

    Comment by Steve Parkes — October 13, 2012 @ 10:06 am

  2. Setting himself even further for the drop in the reshuffle. Obviously wants out.

    Comment by Stephen Doyle — October 13, 2012 @ 10:22 am

  3. If he wants out, he can fucking resign.

    Shane Jones – bought and paid for since ages ago.

    Comment by Gregor W — October 13, 2012 @ 10:37 am

  4. someone get the man a hotel room and a Prezzy card.

    Comment by dfmamea — October 13, 2012 @ 11:12 am

  5. I was actually introduced to Shane at a function on Monday and I now regret that I have neither a time machine nor a ball gag.

    Comment by Stephen J — October 13, 2012 @ 11:38 am

  6. “after four years of total silence on all of his portfolio areas”

    according to the Labour website it doesn’t appear he has any portfolio areas. (he’s on some select committees but not a spokesperson for anything) and he’s slowly slipping down the list… bye Shane, can’t say I’ve ever heard anything of value from you, ever. enjoy that salary while it lasts.

    & btw
    it really annoys me how terms that apply to physical property have been levered into the debate around intellectual property: “theft” “vandalism” and “piracy” being the obvious ones. intellecual property cannot be stolen, pirated or vandalised; it can be copied, distributed, critiqued, satirised and the degree to which these activities should be legal is a legitimate subject for debate. using terms like theft and vandalism biases the discussion and clouds the very obvious and significant differences between intellectual and physical property.

    Comment by nommopilot — October 13, 2012 @ 12:43 pm

  7. Alfred Tennyson.

    Below the thunders of the upper deep;
    Far far beneath in the abysmal sea,
    His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep
    The Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights flee
    About his shadowy sides; above him swell
    Huge sponges of millennial growth and height;
    And far away into the sickly light,
    From many a wondrous grot and secret cell
    Unnumber’d and enormous polypi
    Winnow with giant arms the slumbering green.
    There hath he lain for ages, and will lie
    Battening upon huge seaworms in his sleep,
    Until the latter fire shall heat the deep;
    Then once by man and angels to be seen,
    In roaring he shall rise and on the surface die.

    Comment by frank_db — October 13, 2012 @ 1:16 pm

  8. Im always amused when Green supporters get annoyed at Labour when it attacks Green policies, usually dropping that “largest potential coalition partner” line, but dont care about vice versa.

    Labour and the Greens, potential coalition or no, are different parties with different policies. Presumably there is a reason politicians choose to join Labour instead of the Greens, and I dont have any problem in them saying so.

    Comment by Hugh — October 13, 2012 @ 2:52 pm

  9. “Presumably there is a reason politicians choose to join Labour instead of the Greens, and I dont have any problem in them saying so.”

    But if that reason is “I want to protect corporate entities from those who want to use the entity’s name/symbol to criticise its activities – and especially the corporate entity that used to employ me and that gives me money to help me get elected”, is it a very good one?

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — October 13, 2012 @ 3:58 pm

  10. “Im always amused when Green supporters get annoyed at Labour when it attacks Green policies”

    That’s a good point, Hugh, though this isn’t actually Labour policy – as confirmed on twitter by Clare Curran – it is Shane Jones’ personal view (or whatever passes for a personal view in politicianland). It would have been good if the Herald had mentioned this and possibly included Labour and National’s official policies in their article.

    Comment by nommopilot — October 13, 2012 @ 3:59 pm

  11. So, danyl … did you have Tennyson, Wyndham or Mieville in mind when you titled this post? Is Jones a mythical beast on his last ascent to death, a never-seen space alien that threatens oblivion for humanity, or the God of a squid-worshipping cult?

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — October 13, 2012 @ 4:04 pm

  12. I wonder if maybe the reason share Jones seldom criticizes national’s policies is that he agrees with most of them? on the two ocassions I’ve seen him speak I found him v conservative in his views

    Comment by lucyjh — October 14, 2012 @ 12:52 am

  13. I actually support Jones in this instance.

    It is an industry that he worked hard for and created wealth and jobs for maori.

    It’s an example of a significant tension between the labour and environment movements.

    If there is a Labour/Green/NZF coalition we will see of this, West Coast coal, Northland mineral exploration. On these sorts of issues Labour has more in common with National than with the Greens.

    Comment by NeilM — October 14, 2012 @ 8:20 am

  14. Should be: “we will see more of this”

    Comment by NeilM — October 14, 2012 @ 8:21 am

  15. I also think Jones is right on this issue. Fishermen and women work hard in dangerous conditions and are often the backbone of small regional towns. They don’t deserve to be mocked by Greenpeace, whatever the rightness or wrongness of the issue under debate. Greenpeace is a deeply middle class, Eurocentric organisation which has made a large number of foolish and offensive gestures towards both workers and indigenous people over the years. Back in 2003 I remember them spreading all sorts of nonsense about greedy American workers who wanted cheap petrol for their cars being the cause of the Iraq war. In 2006 they made some racist swipes at Pacific island nations which had the temerity to express pro-whaling opinions.

    Rather than align themselves without an outfit like Greenpeace, the Green Party needs to ask itself how it can start to get working class Kiwis to vote for it. The party runs on a platform that is in general well to the left of Labour’s, yet does far better in posh electorates than in working class and brown seats. They do well in Dunedin North but get trounced in Dunedin South, attract the Grey Lynn latte-drinkers’ vote but have virtually no presence in South Auckland. The cultural insensitivity and complete lack of class consciousness exemplified in Greenpeace’s anti-Sealord video inevitably limit the party’s appeal in large parts of New Zealand.

    Comment by Scott — October 14, 2012 @ 3:25 pm

  16. “I actually support Jones in this instance.”

    Jones’ comments are not so much about the specific accusations in the adbust – he is arguing that parody/satire should not be introduced as a defence against charges of copyright infringement. whether Sealord are economic heroes or ecological villains (or BOTH) is not the point.

    Comment by nommopilot — October 14, 2012 @ 3:59 pm

  17. @Andrew: No, it is definitely not a good one. But Danyls objection seemed to be to the very idea of criticism, not to the specifics of it.

    If his problem is with the reasons Jones chose to distance himself from the Greens, then the fact that the Greens are likely coalition partners for Labour is irrelevant.

    Comment by Hugh — October 14, 2012 @ 7:05 pm

  18. “it really annoys me how terms that apply to physical property have been levered into the debate around intellectual property”

    Personally, I get really annoyed when terms from engineering are introduced to discussions about discourse.

    Comment by J Lee — October 15, 2012 @ 1:27 am

  19. Time for Shane Jones to go. Maybe he was leadership material once….but those days are gone. Dead wood.

    Comment by Steve (@nza1) — October 15, 2012 @ 10:51 am

  20. “On these sorts of issues Labour has more in common with National than with the Greens.”
    You’re welcome to form a Labour-National coalition NeilM – we’ll see how that does for ya…. ;) LabNats has such a nice ring; kinda like LabRats…

    Comment by bob — October 15, 2012 @ 2:26 pm


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