The Dim-Post

July 11, 2012

Plus ca change?

Filed under: general idiocy — danylmc @ 8:03 am

Via Morgan on Twitter, this alleged National Party election ad ‘from the 70s’ is doing the rounds:

The question is: is this a real ad, or a satire? Seems too extreme to be real – although dawn-raids era National was an overtly racist party. But were they this overt? If this was real wouldn’t it have entered into notoriety, along with the dancing cossacks ad? Wouldn’t we have heard about it before?

On the other hand, the nation was a lot more regional back then. It’s not impossible that this was an ad in a regional publication put out by a rural MP that nobody ever noticed until now.

If anyone knows the source of this ad, let me know in the comments and I’ll update the post.

76 Comments »

  1. Pretty sure its a student piss-take. I’m picking Massey: the bloke in the picture is Les Gandar, National minister of education and MP for Manuwatu.

    Nothing in any of the studies on the 1972 election I’ve got mention anything like this, and remember it was the first election advertisements became a big deal because Labour’s were so advanced for their time.

    Somewhat ironically one National MP, Duncan Macintyre, lost his seat that election because he was perceived as being too friendly with Maori.

    Comment by Rob Hosking — July 11, 2012 @ 8:09 am

  2. Possibly a student mock up but more probably an anti-apartheid group doing an anti-NZRFU/National Party ad – remember tours to South Africa were political poison in this country from the late sixities onwards, and Kirk “postponed” the 1973 tour.

    If it is an anti-apartheid message then it is a jolting reminder of how bitter and divisive a issue that was.

    Comment by Sanctuary — July 11, 2012 @ 8:41 am

  3. I remember the dancing Cossacks ads, but there’s no way that’s a genuine 70s political flyer, it’s just way beyond what would have been acceptable at the time. Most likely a student pisstake as Rob Hosking suggests.

    Comment by Psycho Milt — July 11, 2012 @ 8:49 am

  4. OTOH, people in thirty years could look at ACT’s ads for the 2011 election and say, ‘That’s gotta be a joke – it goes WAY beyond what was acceptable for the time.’

    Comment by danylmc — July 11, 2012 @ 9:10 am

  5. Especially since Les Gandar was one of the more liberal National MPs

    Comment by Leopold — July 11, 2012 @ 9:12 am

  6. A facebook friend-of-a-friend says its from an Otago Uni capping magazine. Will try and track down details.

    I’m amazed at how many people think it’s real, but then I’m a historian. I suppose scientists spend much more time being incredulous at some of the pseudo-scientific bullshit people fall for.

    Comment by helenalex — July 11, 2012 @ 9:15 am

  7. although dawn-raids era National was an overtly racist party

    Dawn Raids were started by the Labour Government that preceded Muldoon.

    Comment by Graeme Edgeler — July 11, 2012 @ 9:17 am

  8. I’m of the opinion that Fisking has a more relevant name: Edgelered

    Comment by David C — July 11, 2012 @ 9:22 am

  9. Usual story, Helen – some people have believed its real because they desperately wanted it to be real.

    Comment by Rob Hosking — July 11, 2012 @ 9:26 am

  10. Sounds like the sort of thing the tories do……..

    Comment by Kerry — July 11, 2012 @ 9:34 am

  11. Dawn Raids were started by the Labour Government that preceded Muldoon.

    I didn’t say they started it, I said they were very racist during that era. #firewithfire

    I’m amazed at how many people think it’s real, but then I’m a historian. I suppose scientists spend much more time being incredulous at some of the pseudo-scientific bullshit people fall for.

    My feeling is that it’s probably a joke (p=~0.8) but like a good scientist I desire empirical evidence before I make a judgment.

    Comment by danylmc — July 11, 2012 @ 9:35 am

  12. The “Man for man…” slogan and the Marshall/Muldoon pictures date it to the 1972 election, so it’s pre-Kirk, and thus pre-Dawn Raids.

    I’m pretty sure it’s fake. It’s more offensive than the ACT ads were, even for its time – you did not openly call black people “niggers” in the 1970s, not officially anyway. My feeling is that if this had actually been published it would have been picked up in Barry Gustafson’s history of the National Party, which trawled through almost all the party’s archives, and it wasn’t.

    Comment by Hugh — July 11, 2012 @ 9:38 am

  13. I didn’t say they started it, I said they were very racist during that era. #firewithfire

    I was simply providing historical context. And this one comes up a lot is all.

    you did not openly call black people “niggers” in the 1970s, not officially anyway.

    Was use of the word “nigger” ever all that prevalent in New Zealand? I’m sure it was used by some people occasionally, and I don’t dispute there was a lot of casual racism, but I would have guessed that different epithets would have been applied even during the most racist parts of our history.

    Comment by Graeme Edgeler — July 11, 2012 @ 10:05 am

  14. Toby Manhire found this http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/anti-racism-and-treaty-of-waitangi-activism/3/5 actual 1972 nat poster on Te Ara. If you look at them – both n the way they take about the issue and the typography – they weren’t done by the same outfit – and the Te Ara could be the subject of parody here. Also noting shaded signs of pasting-on of typewriting where the font changes.

    Someone on twitter said they were shock by hearing someone use “nigger” as a kid in the sixties and it wasn’t common or middle class.

    Comment by lyndon — July 11, 2012 @ 10:35 am

  15. Was use of the word “nigger” ever all that prevalent in New Zealand? I’m sure it was used by some people occasionally, and I don’t dispute there was a lot of casual racism, but I would have guessed that different epithets would have been applied even during the most racist parts of our history.

    I have a friend whose grandmother called her (black) cat nigger, and cheerfully stood on the back doorstep at dinner time shouting, ‘Nigger? Nigger?’

    Comment by danylmc — July 11, 2012 @ 10:47 am

  16. I have a friend whose grandmother called her (black) cat nigger, and cheerfully stood on the back doorstep at dinner time shouting, ‘Nigger? Nigger?’

    Oh yes. I’m confident the word nigger was used to describe black things, in the manner of Guy Gibson’s dog. I just have a sense that it wasn’t used particularly often to describe Māori (or Pacific Islanders). Welcome someone who can confirm or contradict my supposition, however.

    Comment by Graeme Edgeler — July 11, 2012 @ 10:56 am

  17. It is real. They had similar ads (TV, theatre) too, which I have viewed at the Film Archive. The first time I voted was when Muldoon lost to Lange and I remember the times well. The Springbok tour showed how fascist the party was.
    Nigger was a common word in my time too and yes, it was used against Maori and PI, there weren’t any other brown people around then. Not only in the playground but on movies, in books, in everyday things. ‘Little Black Sambos and Golly Wogs” were common dolls. “Tar Baby’ was a story told and read in every household. Even Billy Goats Gruff, the white and pure against the ‘black troll sends a very clear message.
    Being called a ‘nigger’ was equal to being called a ‘Hori back then. It was real hurtful and the amount of times the I got into trouble and punished for reacting against being called a nigger is unbelievable. We got strapped and caned then too. Sadistic fucks!
    Another common word was ‘Jew’ used to describe someone who was tight with money. These were common, spoken by teachers, parents, everyone.
    I know a lot of people deny racism in this country but they are white people in their own denial, it’s a different reality when you tainted with the tar brush.

    Comment by indiginz — July 11, 2012 @ 11:26 am

  18. That’s how I recall it Graeme. Never heard the N word used about Maori or Pacific Islanders, & I recall a lot of other racial taunts in the school yard in the 70s. Including ‘black’, oddly enough.

    Returning to the political arena, the only record I know of any NZ politician using the word – albeit in private, and not about Maori – is Norman Kirk. One of the books about him describes him bad-mouthing a former female campaign worker who had taken up with a black US soldier at Operation Deep Freeze – said she was ‘being screwed by a buck nigger’.

    Comment by Rob Hosking — July 11, 2012 @ 11:27 am

  19. Oh yes. I’m confident the word nigger was used to describe black things, in the manner of Guy Gibson’s dog.

    Just so. I recall the father of one my friends back in 1971 referring to worcester sauce as “nigger piss,” but he wouldn’t have done it in polite company, let alone refer to Maori or PIs as niggers. He probably would have called Maoris horis, but I don’t recall a common derogatory term for PIs back then.

    Comment by Psycho Milt — July 11, 2012 @ 11:28 am

  20. I don’t recall a common derogatory term for PIs back then.

    One of Damian Christie’s Hindsight episodes carried a news interviews with a woman on the street who referred to “Coconuts”. B&W footage, so could have been late 60s, early 70s.

    Comment by Graeme Edgeler — July 11, 2012 @ 11:45 am

  21. The National Library doesn’t have Otago capping magazines from the early 1970s, but the Hocken does, so someone in Dunedin with time on their hands could go have a look at the 1972 and 73 editions.

    Of course it’s possible that the ad comes from somewhere else, but buggered if I’m looking through every student/satirical magazine from 1972 and 1973, especially with the Turnbull shut.

    Comment by helenalex — July 11, 2012 @ 11:59 am

  22. Poe’s Law strikes again. As it did in 1972.

    Comment by deepred — July 11, 2012 @ 12:41 pm

  23. Nigger was common and I was called that many times as a kid, from other kids and occasionally from adults. The amount of times I was punished for reacting to being called a nigger, well I can’t even count. They caned and strapped us in those days. I can’t remember anyone being strapped for calling us niggers. But hitting them for it was punished by hitting us. “Hori’ was just as insulting as nigger, so be careful who you say that around, even now. We were the Pa kids. I wasn’t allowed at some of my friends houses. My best friends. Black Sambos and Golly Wogs were common dolls, toys and the Tar Baby stories were read in everyone’s houses. Even Billy Goats Gruff with the pure white goats and the big ugly black troll sent a very clear message. Jew was a common word too referring to people tight with money. Everybody said this, except us. We weren’t allowed. I first voted when Muldoon lost to Lange and remember that era well. Took time off school to march against the Boks. If the poster above is fake, I’d be real surprised.

    Comment by indiginz — July 11, 2012 @ 12:49 pm

  24. The “Man for Man” slogan, which is not satire, is bad enough

    Comment by Leg Break — July 11, 2012 @ 12:49 pm

  25. I asume the election flyer is satire, from the unenlightened 1970’s.

    Whereas in 2011:

    http://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2011/06/deaker_and_the_n_word.html

    Comment by sammy 2.0 — July 11, 2012 @ 12:59 pm

  26. Somewhere in my garage I have a copy of Salient with a photo of Lange on the front “If Salient think I am going to apear on their cover they can get fucked” I wish I could lay my hands on it. From memory, it was about the time Viz started to circulate via record shops.

    Comment by Clunking Fist — July 11, 2012 @ 1:28 pm

  27. The “Man for Man” slogan, which is not satire, is bad enough

    Yeah, when you consider that one was a genuine Nat slogan at the time it’s easy to understand how people could assume the rest of that flyer might be genuine.

    Comment by Psycho Milt — July 11, 2012 @ 1:47 pm

  28. The “Man for Man” slogan, which is not satire, is bad enough

    Its also accurate. Back then, there were only three or four women in Parliament. Just another example of the past being a different country.

    Comment by Idiot/Savant (@norightturnnz) — July 11, 2012 @ 2:29 pm

  29. Indiginz, I’m sorry for your experience. I don’t even recall nigger/golliwog/etc being acceptable in school playgrounds in the 1960s. Some telltale would usually tell the teacher, resulting in apologies in front of class. “Hori”, “wog” etc. insults were certainly more common, We used “Scottish” or “Scrooge” rather than Jew, when referring to meanness.

    I recall some outrage in social studies classes over a contempory 1960s UK anti-immigration campaign ( Conservative? ) ” If you want a nigger for a neighbour, vote Labour”.

    Like many above, I suspect a 1970s student magazine was the source of the poster..

    Comment by Bruce Hamilton — July 11, 2012 @ 2:53 pm

  30. @Sammy – Good god, some of the comments in that Kiwiblog thread are horrendous. People who think they are fighting ‘PC’ by being offensive to ethnic minorities, thats just the most blinkered form of privilege informed racism.

    Comment by alex — July 11, 2012 @ 2:58 pm

  31. “…I don’t even recall nigger/golliwog/etc being acceptable in school playgrounds in the 1960s…”

    Sometimes we were just incredibly innocent though. I still remember as a nipper the first time (on a visit to the big smoke of Wellington) I saw a proper black person, a US sailor from the USS Truxtun. I stopped and bug eyed stared slack jawed at him like he was as alien-looking as a Ferengi. Which to my eyes he was. Goodness only knows what he made of a couple of schoolboys staring at him. Mind you, I wasn’t as much of a Cleitus as my best mate, who on that trip beheld his first escalator and spent about ten minutes just going up and down it.

    Comment by Sanctuary — July 11, 2012 @ 3:09 pm

  32. It looks like a combination of typewriter and photo-copier. It resembles the stuff that was put in letterboxes in Christchurch in the late 80s about me that said I was a Moscow-aligned communist because I sat on the Electoral Reform Coalition national executive with an SUP member. This was odd on several counts as I didn’t live in Christchurch and I’m not a communist of any stripe. Quite why people in Chch needed to be letterboxed about me (not running for office anywhere) I was never able to work out. In short, there are lunatics everywhere…and this item is probably the work of one (or several) of them.

    Comment by Steve (@nza1) — July 11, 2012 @ 3:47 pm

  33. @Alex – That’s why the comments on Kiwiblog have often been collectively referred to as “the sewer”. I used to read DPF’s blog, but his evolution into a one-eyed party hack is now more or less complete and his blog attracts a very unsavoury element the SIS and GCSB would be remiss to not have under constant surveillance.

    Comment by Steve (@nza1) — July 11, 2012 @ 3:58 pm

  34. I used to read DPF’s blog, but his evolution into a one-eyed party hack is now more or less complete

    I am confident it will be a much better read when National is next out of government.

    Comment by Graeme Edgeler — July 11, 2012 @ 4:35 pm

  35. I am confident it will be a much better read when National is next out of government.

    Did The Standard become “a much better read” when Labour were voted out of power?

    Comment by Phil — July 11, 2012 @ 5:26 pm

  36. Maybe it’s a genuine message from a white nationalist group?

    Comment by Laura — July 11, 2012 @ 5:37 pm

  37. The main type set in all capitals indicates it wasn’t done by anyone with a skerrick of publishing, editorial or design knowledge. Even by early 1970s standards.

    Comment by billbennettnz — July 11, 2012 @ 6:16 pm

  38. Yes, all caps format is not likely from a student magazine.

    I’m guessing it’s a leaflet from a group like the National Socialist (Nazi) Party of New Zealand, whose leader Colin King-Ansell was a candidate in the 1972 election. Left wing groups were backing Labour in the 1972 election, so maybe this was a complementary strategy by the far right, who were alarmed by the rise of Maori nationalism, Pacific immigration and the anti-Vietnam war movement, as well as Labour’s policy against a Springbok tour. Paul Spoonley’s book on the far right might have the answer: “The Politics of Nostalgia: racism and the extreme right in New Zealand”, The Dunmore Press (1987)

    Comment by Laura — July 11, 2012 @ 6:57 pm

  39. “The “Man for Man” slogan, which is not satire, is bad enough”

    Leaving aside the gender element, John Johansson once remarked that it was basically admitting that John Marshall would make a worse PM than Kirk.

    Comment by Hugh — July 11, 2012 @ 9:14 pm

  40. If this had been a real ad in 1972 it would have been a big story. The MP in question, Les Gandar, went on to become a liberal Minister of Education. In truth this was a relatively liberal, permissive era in which meany of things we now take for granted first emerged. The Maori renaissance can be dated from this era. Nga Tamatoa was around and the 1975 land march was not far away. National had four Maori MPs in general seats later in the decade. I went to three high schools in this era with large, medium and small numbers of Maori students without ever hearing a racial epithet. In schools i went to any Pakeha using the term would have done so at great peril! The first time I heard the word nigger used was in a rugby crowd at the Sydney cricket ground referring to the great french player Serge Blanco. I am sure the word was used in NZ but it was very uncommon. It will have been heard in public far more in the last two decades because of its prevalence in rap. The idea the poster is real is as odd as the assertion I heard the other day that the height of the cold war was 1981.

    Comment by Roger — July 11, 2012 @ 9:27 pm

  41. well it might be a bit un PC – but we could do with a bit of straight up talk in politics these days. All we get now with all the humour police that there are – is drab weasel words.

    Its going to be interesting to see what they do in the re-make of the dam busters. The head pilot had a dog called nigger – who was an important part of the daily life of 617 Sq. – and they (the film makers) are terrified to use it.

    Comment by barry — July 11, 2012 @ 9:40 pm

  42. @ Laura – Labour wasn’t against a tour in the 1972 election. Kirk reversed the position after he was elected.

    Comment by Rob Hosking — July 11, 2012 @ 9:48 pm

  43. Anyone for a modern fake theory?

    Comment by Sanctuary — July 11, 2012 @ 10:15 pm

  44. @Laura: Why would Ansell-King be trying to get people to vote for National?

    Comment by Hugh — July 12, 2012 @ 3:50 am

  45. man for man… Esme and Rona didn’t tell us something …..

    Ethel McMillan 1953-75 (Age when elected ) 51 Labour North Dunedin/Dunedin North
    Esme Tombleson 1960-72 43 National Gisborne
    Rona Stevenson 1963-72 52 National Taupo
    Whetu Tirikatene-Sullivan 1967-96 35 Labour Southern Maori

    Comment by Bruce Hamilton — July 12, 2012 @ 9:06 am

  46. I was a newspaper subeditor in those days…. it would have been highly topical if real, and extensively discussed. Also, there wasn’t a strong attitude to “Nigger” as a derogatory phrase, though the PC-wannabes rapidly changed that! Student magazine? What, as an attempt to knock the National vote on a university campus? Huh! My hypothesis: a modern mash-up by a self-made smart-ass … guaranteed to get the bloggers frothing. Yeah!

    Comment by Doug McNeill — July 12, 2012 @ 9:19 am

  47. I’ve done a little bit of digging, and it turns out there WAS a white supremacy faction in the National Party in the early 1970s, led by David Crawford, who split from National in 1975 in protest over continuing PI immigration, and went on to found the National Front. Apparently this kind of material was exactly the kind that Crawford et al circulated. I’d still like to track down the source.

    Comment by danylmc — July 12, 2012 @ 9:34 am

  48. Although . . .

    Paul Spoonley suggests it came from the ‘National Socialist White Peoples Party ‘ Apparently Colin King Ansell was a printer.

    Comment by danylmc — July 12, 2012 @ 10:43 am

  49. “Man for man” Again we are losing the context of the times. Back then man as in mankind or chairman was a whole lot simpler way of referring to the collective human race than “persons”. the strive for female equality, even though it was necessary, led to many useful words being termed sexist and therefore bo longer PC.

    Comment by Rab — July 12, 2012 @ 11:27 am

  50. @ danylmc: Do I get a chocolate fish🙂

    @ Rob Hosking: my error in regard to the timing of Labour’s policy, but I think the wider Labour Party was identified as being more anti-tour than National, with many members supporting and participating in the anti-tour actions of the early 1970s..

    @ Hugh: tactical voting.

    @ Roger: “In truth this was a relatively liberal, permissive era in which many of things we now take for granted first emerged.” You’re dreaming, mate! They didn’t just “emerge” – they were won, through many battles with the conservative Establishment. Some far right organisations also date from this period, eg, the League of Rights (see this excerpt from Poneke’s blog on Stephen Judd’s blog http://vital.org.nz/entry/title/the_demise_of_the_new_zealand_league_of_rights )

    Comment by Laura — July 12, 2012 @ 11:44 am

  51. The kerning is terrible. So it’s either an amateur job from the 1970s, or an amateur job from the 2010s. No typesetter would have allowed that document to go to print.

    Comment by George D — July 12, 2012 @ 11:52 am

  52. For those who think this is a reall National Party poster then I have a package deal for you -the identity of the other person on the grassy knoll in Dallas and the Auckland and Sydney Harbour Bridges in one sweet combination

    Laura – happy to have an argument about something substantive or a proposition I have actually put forward. Otherwise……..?

    Comment by Roger — July 12, 2012 @ 1:39 pm

  53. @ Barry #41: The Dambusters’ screenwriter Stephen Fry said last year that the dog’s name has been changed from Nigger to Digger.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-lincolnshire-13727908

    Comment by Ataahua — July 12, 2012 @ 1:44 pm

  54. I asked Scott Hamilton about this – he pointed out that the rhetoric is closer to that used by UK far right groups of the period (Kenyan Wogs etc) and postulates that someone pasted National Party pictures and slogans onto it.

    Comment by danylmc — July 12, 2012 @ 2:17 pm

  55. @Roger

    “I went to three high schools in this era with large, medium and small numbers of Maori students without ever hearing a racial epithet.”

    @Barry

    “well it might be a bit un PC – but we could do with a bit of straight up talk in politics these days.”

    Evidently, the goalposts from the Golden Age can shift with the wind.

    On the one hand, there wasn’t a problem because racist words were never used (apparently). On the other hand, there wasn’t a problem because the words WERE used, but nobody cared – and apparently the problem is that they do now.

    Revisionism in opposite directions.

    How about: there was racism, plenty of it, and now there’s still racism, but it’s much less acceptable. And that’s a good thing. Call it “PC” if it makes you feel better. Or we could just call it respect for other people.

    Comment by sammy 2.0 — July 12, 2012 @ 3:14 pm

  56. Sammy. No revisionism. As someone with a Maori parent and a pakeha parent, I was probably a bit more likely than most to take offense and express it with my fists. While I had a few fights at school none were on this subject. When racism was expressed it was done in different ways to the standard Hollywood model

    Comment by Roger — July 12, 2012 @ 3:36 pm

  57. During high-school in the mid 90’s, the only time I can recall racial slurs coming out were on the Football field. We had a Sri Lankan mid-fielder who went by the nickname ‘Nigga’.
    He used it in refering to himself more than anyone else ever did; said it made him sound “Gangsta”.

    Slightly related, I know of a masters thesis at Vic which is researching the evolving use of the word ‘Cunt’. Apparently in some societal cirlces it’s now being used as a compliment.
    As in: “He’s a good cunt” being similar to “he’s a good bastard”.

    Comment by Phil — July 12, 2012 @ 3:49 pm

  58. @Rab: yep, having to say ‘people’ or ‘humans’ instead of ‘man’ is a heck of a chore. I can feel my fingers practically dropping off after the effort of having to type those extra three letters.

    @Phil: clearly you haven’t spent much time in bogan circles, where ‘good cunt’ has been a term of praise / affection since at least the mid 1990s, possibly earlier.

    Also, I’m embarrassed to admit that in primary school in the 1980s we all used the non-PC version of ‘eeny meeny miny mo’, although without having any kind of clue what a ‘nigger’ was.

    Comment by helenalex — July 12, 2012 @ 4:49 pm

  59. What conclusions would one hope to draw if the flyer was found to be genuine?

    Jolly hilarious, nonetheless, I suppose

    Comment by Andrew M — July 12, 2012 @ 7:03 pm

  60. skinny white boy from southampton imported to nz 73 age 7. 7 years later called my best mate the big somoan a nigger, he chased me but i was faster but. his 1st 15 mate tacked me. he pinned me down and gave me the typewriter. repeatly i am not a nigger, i am a coconut.

    Comment by frank_db — July 12, 2012 @ 9:09 pm

  61. Following Scott Hamilton, I think it’s most likely to be a compilation of genuine far right rhetoric (probably borrowed from the UK by local supporters) and National Party slogans.

    It may have been published in, or distributed with, Chris Wheeler’s satirical underground magazine, ‘Cock’, circulated among students at Victoria University. The magazine was numbered but not dated (hence the reference “in the 1970s”). Apparently, Cock was published on various printing presses around Wellington to avoid detection, because the National Government’s 1951 waterfront dispute emergency regulations, prohibiting unregistered publications, were still in effect. Its subversive humour would have made it a direct target. For this reason, it would have been ignored by the mainstream press.

    Comment by Laura — July 13, 2012 @ 11:11 am

  62. The National Front still haven’t answered my emails.

    Comment by danylmc — July 13, 2012 @ 1:39 pm

  63. @Laura: And people voting for the Nats would provide Ansell-King a tactical benefit how?

    Comment by Hugh — July 14, 2012 @ 3:41 am

  64. Cock’s undoing was when Chris Wheeler published information in good faith from a presumed reliable source. When the information proved to be inaccurate – mistaken identity – and highly personally actionable he appeared to decide that the time had arrived to trade radical politics for organic agriculture. He achieved a hell of a lot in the years he ran the magazine. His informant presumably became meticulous about checking their facts, as they’ve remained an effective political activist.

    It seems unlikely that the Nigger Lover nonsense would ever have been associated with Cock, even as an example of inadvertent satire, as there’s nothing overtly amusing about it. Wheeler would never have presented his readers with a cup of cold sick and simply invited them to revel in how gross it was. He’d have been a hell of a blogger, for a while.

    Comment by Joe W — July 14, 2012 @ 3:55 am

  65. “The National Front still haven’t answered my emails.”

    Well, with a jewish name like “Mclauchlan”, what do you expect?

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — July 14, 2012 @ 7:19 am

  66. The National Front still haven’t answered my emails.

    I think they might be too busy liking this ‘political party’ website. https://www.facebook.com/ournz/posts/393426827359833

    Comment by Richard — July 14, 2012 @ 2:07 pm

  67. Graeme Edgeler

    I attended a Maori primary school from 1951 to 58 and a predominantly Maori secondary school from 1959 to 1964 – in Northland – and I do not recall hearing the term ‘nigger’ used. ‘Hori’ and ‘black bastard,’ ‘fuckin’ thieves’ were common terms, most often used by one Maori to describe another. I don’t remember there being racism displayed by whites against Maori nor by Maori against white..

    The first time I came across genuine and nasty anti-Maori sentiment was when I attended university in Canterbury. That should tell you something.

    I’s be very surprised indeed if that advert is anything other than a fake, although it appears some commenters here desperately would like it to be real..

    Comment by Rob Ripley — July 14, 2012 @ 2:07 pm

  68. Uh-oh, DPF is getting all passive-aggressive on Danyl.

    Comment by Sanctuary — July 14, 2012 @ 4:31 pm

  69. I find the suggestion that this was done by a rural MP offensive.

    Comment by john — July 14, 2012 @ 5:11 pm

  70. It seems Danyl is determined to re-invent the wheel in his own researches – sure, every credible source says that this is fake, but if he wants to pretend to be some kind of Political Indiana Jones in search of the blindingly obvious, it’s a free country, I guess.

    Comment by Hugh — July 14, 2012 @ 5:55 pm

  71. What is a credible source? An eyewitness account, and not anonymous?

    http://www.listener.co.nz/commentary/the-internaut/national-1972-%E2%80%9Cnigger%E2%80%9D-campaign-ad-clearly-implausible-%E2%80%93-but-where-did-it-come-from/

    There’s been a convenient blurring of the “fake” question – on here, on Kiwiblog, etc – because the question has many different answers. Clearly people pick and choose their favourites.

    It could be fake and printed recently. It could be fake and 40 years old. It could be fake and far right. Or fake and far left. A renegade or an opponent? Or simply, a fake and a joke.

    It may well be both real AND fake – an actual leaflet distributed at the time, but not produced by the National Party. If Mr Howard’s memory is correct, that is entirely possible.

    Comment by sammy 2.0 — July 14, 2012 @ 6:25 pm

  72. Morgan Godfrey Pffffffffffft

    Comment by Lookinthemirror — July 14, 2012 @ 7:59 pm

  73. Fake and blatant mischief making by Dim.

    Comment by Mark — July 14, 2012 @ 10:59 pm

  74. If you reduce the gamma on the election ad you will see text on the back, and what looks like a face. I can’t read the back even when reversed.

    Comment by jaymam — July 15, 2012 @ 7:22 pm

  75. We have a winner: https://twitter.com/karenhurley/status/225791873321676801 Massey capping mag 1973.

    Comment by lyndon — July 19, 2012 @ 3:23 pm

  76. Well. .

    Comment by rob Hosking — July 19, 2012 @ 3:25 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: