The Dim-Post

June 21, 2016

Also ugh

Filed under: Uncategorized — danylmc @ 1:50 pm

Via Radio New Zealand:

Te Papa has bought the iconic black singlet Peter Snell wore during his twin gold medal runs at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics for $122,500 – more than double the auction estimate.

The singlet sold this morning at Cordy’s Auctions in Auckland, with competition from two phone bidders ramping up the price.

Te Papa chief executive Rick Ellis said he was thrilled to acquire the singlet for New Zealanders.

“It’s a great thrill for New Zealand and an item that has so much to tell us about our history, and the history of sport.”

They shut down their award-winning publishing company so they could buy a fucking singlet.

46 Comments »

  1. Indeed, WTF…

    Comment by Neville Lowry — June 21, 2016 @ 2:00 pm

  2. Quite obvious they’re running a Snell game.

    FM

    Comment by Fooman — June 21, 2016 @ 2:16 pm

  3. They shut down their award-winning publishing company so they could buy a fucking singlet.

    No. They shut down their award-winning publishing company so they could buy a fucking award winning singlet. The level of awards comes out equal.

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — June 21, 2016 @ 2:20 pm

  4. Honestly, Danyl, what part of living in NZ for the last 40-odd years has left you unprepared for this sort of development? Personally, I think that Te Papa buying sports memorabilia unrelated to rugby is a radical and progressive development. Baby steps…

    Comment by Nick R — June 21, 2016 @ 2:59 pm

  5. “an item that has so much to tell us about our history, and the history of sport”

    Exclusive tell-all interview with singlet, coming soon to VodaStuffSkyHerald, or whatever it’s called.

    Comment by sammy 3.0 — June 21, 2016 @ 3:07 pm

  6. Did it shut down Te Papa Press?

    In practice, it seems yes … even if in theory it can say no: http://thespinoff.co.nz/books/28-04-2016/what-the-hell-is-going-on-at-te-papa-press/

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — June 21, 2016 @ 3:15 pm

  7. Te Papa chief executive Rick Ellis said he was thrilled to acquire the singlet for New Zealanders.

    The important thing of course is now that we’ve shelled out for it, who gets to wear it?

    Comment by Gregor W — June 21, 2016 @ 3:32 pm

  8. an item that has so much to tell us about our history

    Those who learn their history by listening to a black singlet are doomed to, umm, something.

    Comment by herr doktor bimler — June 21, 2016 @ 3:40 pm

  9. “The singlet sold this morning at Cordy’s Auctions in Auckland, with competition from two phone bidders ramping up the price”

    You see what happened here …dummy bidders once they knew Te Papa boys had arrived in town.

    Comment by duker — June 21, 2016 @ 4:05 pm

  10. “Baked beans, television, Te Papa and a nation’s heritage – it’s all business.” The Rick Ellis approach to everything …

    Comment by Robinson Stowell — June 21, 2016 @ 4:05 pm

  11. The important thing of course is now that we’ve shelled out for it, who gets to wear it?

    Some fashion tragic.

    Comment by Joe W — June 21, 2016 @ 4:34 pm

  12. They were probably bidding against the Auckland Museum …

    Comment by Brent — June 21, 2016 @ 4:40 pm

  13. Thanks @Andrew. I do remember reading that article and then as now I have to wonder if it is not actually a good news story. Obviously the former staff are highly regarded enough in their sunset industry that they could get other jobs, and obviously there is the VUP to service local authors, allowing Te Papa to concentrate on its knitting. The one downside I can see is that VU has always been so prissy that we’re unlikely to see them publish any more collections of Victorian smut🙂

    Comment by Robert Singers — June 21, 2016 @ 5:52 pm

  14. Nothing prissier than smut. We publish the real thing: http://vup.victoria.ac.nz/hera-lindsay-bird/

    Comment by Fergus — June 21, 2016 @ 8:37 pm

  15. A) this just reeks of Rick Ellis. Why that man is regarded as wunderkind is beyond me.

    B) can someone explain why anyone wants the singlet? What DOES this tell us? Genuine question because I just don’t understand the interest in this.

    Comment by The Baron — June 21, 2016 @ 8:55 pm

  16. I can’t see what the big deal is. Each year Te Papa spends up to $3 million on paintings and other artwork.

    https://www.tepapa.govt.nz/about/press-and-media/press-releases/2015-news-and-media-releases/te-papa-brings-colonial

    Comment by Ross — June 21, 2016 @ 10:51 pm

  17. ‘Fucking singlet’ – item of male lingerie common in New Zealand, usually woolen or cotton?

    Comment by Antoine — June 22, 2016 @ 7:22 am

  18. Is there a collective term for group pearl clutching? The term moral panic lost its cachet when it was discovered it could occur at both ends of the political spectrum.

    Comment by Tinakori — June 22, 2016 @ 8:52 am

  19. “It’s a great thrill for New Zealand and an item that has so much to tell us about our history, and the history of sport.”

    It would be nice if the “so much to tell us about our history” promise turns out to have more credibility than the “great thrill for New Zealand” promise (I was profoundly un-thrilled), but somehow I doubt it.

    Comment by Psycho Milt — June 22, 2016 @ 9:03 am

  20. Is there a collective term for group pearl clutching? The term moral panic lost its cachet when it was discovered it could occur at both ends of the political spectrum.

    I’m sure you can coin some form of Derangement Syndrome if you try heard enough.

    Comment by Gregor W — June 22, 2016 @ 11:45 am

  21. *hard enough

    Comment by Gregor W — June 22, 2016 @ 11:45 am

  22. I understand that when Rick Ellis did his walk around of the Te Papa departments and staff after his appointment, he found himself in the conservation department. Apparently he asked them whether they collaborated with DOC very often.

    Comment by Dr Foster — June 22, 2016 @ 3:02 pm

  23. I look forward to the Te Papa national Singlet Tour in which a bloody great black bus goes from town to village to town. All funded by gummint cut backs to wannabe artists and writers who never would have made it anyway.

    Comment by Adolf Fiinkensein — June 22, 2016 @ 3:19 pm

  24. The Right People

    Sir Humphrey
    “You need a system to protect the important things of life – and keep them out of the hands of the barbarians.

    Things like the Opera.
    Radio Three.
    The Countryside.
    The Law.
    The Universities…

    … both of them.”

    Comment by Tom Hunter — June 22, 2016 @ 3:47 pm

  25. yes, it is amazing that they want to fund the purchase of something that is a significant moment in NZ history. I wonder how many New Zealanders will see the singlet as oppose read one of the publications? I wonder how many New Zealanders are familiar with Peter Snell and his obviously minor achievement of winning Olympic gold medals compared to the cultural brilliance that the publishing company (which was obviously bank rolled by the tax payer ) would publish…

    Comment by rjs131 — June 22, 2016 @ 4:12 pm

  26. “26.yes, it is amazing that they want to fund the purchase of something that is a significant moment in NZ history”
    Indeed! because if they HADN’T bought it, it would have been shredded: recycled and made into eco-friendly wall insulation for retrofitting older houses. My life is meager and sparse due to the lack of access to Sir Ed’s crampons, John Walker’s shorts or Brendon McCullum’s box.

    Comment by Clunking Fist — June 22, 2016 @ 5:06 pm

  27. David Farrar considers you an oh so awful snob Danyl! Farrar clearly doesnt like unregulated words from high falutin’ smarty pants types. Such words may lead to thinking, imagination and wonder. You cant put those in a glass case to gawk at like an icon, a reverent confirmation of our cultural preference for anything that doesnt require asking unsettling questions or having vaguely subversive thoughts! We all know that things you can’t monetise and capture in a case just cause problems, eh? Intellectuals. Old Adolf at comment 24, everyones favourite collector of children’s toys that accidentially landed on his lawn, namesake knew what to do with errant intellectuals!

    Comment by Sanctuary — June 22, 2016 @ 8:24 pm

  28. Seems a reasonable purchase to me. NZ’s culture’s been heavily influenced by sport and sporting achievement. You can ague whether that’s good or bad but a national museum certainly has a legit interest in sporting history.

    Comment by Gav Faemonty — June 22, 2016 @ 11:03 pm

  29. “Such words may lead to thinking, imagination and wonder.”

    It’s true, this blog post greatly added to my sense of wonder

    Comment by Ortvin Sarapuu — June 23, 2016 @ 12:08 am

  30. @ clunking

    Or perish the thought it could have gone to a WEALTHY PRIVATE COLLECTOR! Or even worse a FURRENER!

    Comment by insider — June 23, 2016 @ 9:07 am

  31. Or perish the thought it could have gone to a WEALTHY PRIVATE COLLECTOR! Or even worse a FURRENER!

    Bloody Chinese! They come here, buy our houses and singlets. Soon we’ll be tenants in our own underwear!

    Comment by Gregor W — June 23, 2016 @ 9:29 am

  32. It is admittedly more significant to New Zealand history than all the statues of orcs and elves dotted throughout Te Papa. It’s a problem, though, that most New Zealanders don’t know much about own history. Like, our actual history: wars and other major events that shaped the nation and have huge consequences today, and instead we get this pseudohistory based on very inconsequential things, like winning a gold medal that are inflated up into great and celebrated events because they (very very briefly) won us the approval of the rest of the world.

    Comment by danylmc — June 23, 2016 @ 9:53 am

  33. @Danyl: Which wars do you think NZers are underinformed about? Both WW1 and WW2 are massive presences in almost everybody’s understanding of history. If anything I’d say the opposite is true, the popular understanding of history is based too much on the idea of history as a series of “charismatic” events (wars, disasters, sharp economic dysjunctions) and too little on long term, subtle effects (counterculture, liberalisation, atomisation).

    Comment by Ortvin Sarapuu — June 23, 2016 @ 10:09 am

  34. Which wars do you think NZers are underinformed about?

    The New Zealand wars … you know, the ones that actually happened here.

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — June 23, 2016 @ 10:11 am

  35. The New Zealand wars … you know, the ones that actually happened here.

    Silly Andrew! Wars against brown people aren’t real ones.

    Comment by Gregor W — June 23, 2016 @ 10:17 am

  36. The New Zealand wars … you know, the ones that actually happened here.

    Which, among the various commemorations at Canberra’s Australian National War Memorial, happen to be the earliest wars involving “Australian” forces.

    Comment by Joe W — June 23, 2016 @ 10:18 am

  37. @Andrew: Yeah, fair enough.

    It’s funny, growing up in the South Island, I was always told (not by my actual formal history teachers) that the New Zealand wars were a regional event that had little effect outside the Central North Island.

    Comment by Ortvin Sarapuu — June 23, 2016 @ 10:22 am

  38. Yep, now that Te Papa has done a good job on WW1 it needs to do both WW2 and warfare in NZ. Maybe the old Dominion Museum, the site of the main and excellent WW1 exhibition, could be expanded to become the NZ war museum covering the period from the musket wars to Afghanistan and Iraq. It would be a great space for something that comprehensive. Gradually, Te Papa is improving its performance but it is still very disappointing compared with what it could be. The Peter McLeavey biography by the Te Papa Press is the best from that source I have read but I am pretty sure it would have been published elsewhere if Te Papa had not taken it on.

    Comment by Tinakori — June 23, 2016 @ 11:28 am

  39. I’m sure some “pearl clutcher” will be along shortly to accuse you of glorifying war Tinakori. I’m a bit confused tho’, why do you think NZ needs two war museums?

    Comment by Robert Singers — June 23, 2016 @ 3:19 pm

  40. Tinakori, why only go back as far as the musket wars? I’m pretty sure there was inter-tribal conflict before pākehā came along. Or does that not count as New Zealand in your mind?

    Sadly, it seems MCH follow the same limitation – their online history of NZ-related warfare only starts around 1810.

    FM

    Comment by Fooman — June 23, 2016 @ 3:19 pm

  41. War is pretty fundamental to our history and to making sense of our past and only if we are very lucky indeed will it not be a a part of our future. And with even more luck those wars will be elsewhere rather than here. So not much of an issue with a possible oversupply of war museums. We also have dedicated museums for the army and the air force and the former is pretty good on the realities of war.

    I assume you are referring to the Auckland War Memorial Museum as the other one? While it’s a great display of hardware it doesn’t deal much with the causes of the two wars it commemorates or, aside from a few small displays, the reality of war on the ground, sea and air.. It is also an explicitly Auckland museum focused on remembering the dead from within the old Auckland provincial boundaries.

    The reason I suggest the Musket Wars as a starting point is because they and the NZ Wars that followed are quite closely linked and had an impact on Maori and English perceptions of who possessed or occupied or was linked with particular pieces of land and for how long. They also had an impact on the ability of Maori groups to manage the impact of the arrival of the settlers. The impacts were particularly large in Tamaki Makaurau and Taranaki. In a sense the muskets represented the impact of the outside world as much as the settlers did. Both had a tremendous impact on the use and possession of land.

    Comment by Tinakori — June 23, 2016 @ 5:40 pm

  42. …the realities of war.

    Those harsh realities of war eh. Was that you who pulled Corporal Muldoon from a North African wadi, when the grappling hook lodged in his cheek? So looking forward to the Weta Workshop diorama.

    Comment by Joe W — June 23, 2016 @ 6:58 pm

  43. @Tinakori: Can you seriously say people don’t know enough about WW2? It’s hard to think of a war that’s less obscure.

    The absolute last thing the popular understanding of history needs is even more WW2.

    Comment by Ortvin Sarapuu — June 24, 2016 @ 1:41 am

  44. @Tinekori I was referring to the National Army museum in Waiouru http://www.armymuseum.co.nz/

    Comment by Robert Singers — June 24, 2016 @ 10:39 am

  45. “Those harsh realities of war eh”

    My apologies for the cliche.

    “Can you seriously say people don’t know enough about WW2? It’s hard to think of a war that’s less obscure.”

    I sure can. People under 50 would, I think, know more about WW1 than WW2 because of the impact of ANZAC Day. The people who experienced WW2 directly are almost gone, their children, the boomers, are getting on and after that there’s a very thin level of knowledge about it. In our museums we have quite a bit of hardware from WW2 but not much explanation.

    Comment by Tinakori — June 24, 2016 @ 6:39 pm


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