The Dim-Post

July 14, 2016

Bleg

Filed under: Uncategorized — danylmc @ 9:35 am

There is a very famous photo from, I think, Life magazine during the Luce period that showed a political victory parade of cars, with the winner (a US state governor, I think, or maybe a presidential nominee?) standing in the foreground in the back of a truck, looking flushed and ecstatic. It’s been described as the greatest political photo of all time. But I can’t remember the photographer, or google up the photo. Anyone?

Update: Thanks to Brad, in the comments who found it. Behold:

53e6a71592afa.image

18 Comments »

  1. Is it one of these? http://time.com/3874731/politics-life-magazine-photos-from-the-campaign-trail/

    Comment by Michael — July 14, 2016 @ 10:25 am

  2. It’s been described as the greatest political photo of all time

    I always thought that was “Dewey defeats Truman”.

    Comment by Gregor W — July 14, 2016 @ 11:21 am

  3. Is it one of these? No, I looked through all of them.

    Comment by danylmc — July 14, 2016 @ 11:48 am

  4. Heh. Wedell Wilkie. This was pretty much the high point of his political career … before Roosevelt crushed him in the 1940 election and then Dewey beat him for the 1944 Republican nomination.

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — July 14, 2016 @ 12:23 pm

  5. Wilkie. It’s actually always looked to me like a still from Mr Smith Goes to Washington or similar. There’s something of the cinema of that era about it.

    Meanwhile…always kind of liked this photo. http://www.gettyimages.co.nz/pictures/british-conservative-education-minister-margaret-thatcher-news-photo-2635441#british-conservative-education-minister-margaret-thatcher-with-a-of-picture-id2635441

    Comment by robhosking — July 14, 2016 @ 12:42 pm

  6. It’s a great photo. These post-truth days, of course, we would be more likely to see a picture of a PM with a private part of his anatomy inserted into a pig, despite the fact that no-one could actually produce the picture or corroborate the story.

    Comment by McNulty — July 14, 2016 @ 12:54 pm

  7. One more Wilkie.

    Comment by Joe W — July 14, 2016 @ 3:23 pm

  8. Is that Huey Long, or is it from All the Kings Men?

    Comment by max — July 14, 2016 @ 3:33 pm

  9. I’ve always liked this photo, in part because the focus is on the voters (not the candidates), in part because it shows people thinking that politics actually matters, and in part because of the hats.

    http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/wellington-crowds-election-night-1931

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — July 14, 2016 @ 4:13 pm

  10. Wow, eleven comments in and nobody comparing Wilkie to Trump? (Lack of political experience, distinctive hair, and… well, that’s it, but who are we to resist a superficially appealing political metaphor that plays to our biases?)

    Comment by Ortvin Sarapuu — July 14, 2016 @ 4:54 pm

  11. @12 Ortvin: What about the meaningless catchphrase “I believe in America” or the fact that “his delivery was ineffective almost to the point of being awkward. The speech was a big disappointment.” And then (contrary to Andrew’s assertion @ 5) Willkie went on to do pretty well in the election, capturing 45% of the popular vote.

    Comment by McNulty — July 14, 2016 @ 6:14 pm

  12. And then (contrary to Andrew’s assertion @ 5) Willkie went on to do pretty well in the election, capturing 45% of the popular vote.

    Not quite sure how losing the popular vote by 10% (and the electoral college by 449-82 counts as “do[ing] pretty well in the election”. But maybe you mean by comparison with how Trump will fare against H. Clinton come November?

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — July 14, 2016 @ 6:51 pm

  13. Ah yes! How could I forget that the arcane processes of the US election have little to do with how many people actually vote for you…

    Comment by McNulty — July 14, 2016 @ 7:07 pm

  14. Even on raw popular vote totals, Wilkie really didn’t do very well at all. Of the 38 major party candidates to run since 1940, his 45% was the 12th lowest share gained. And note that this list includes the ’92 & ’96 elections when Ross Perot sucked in a double digit share of the vote.

    That said, Wilkie did a lot better than either Hoover or Landon did against Roosevelt in ’32 or ’36 (but not as well as Dewey did in ’44).

    Comment by Andrew Geddis — July 14, 2016 @ 7:30 pm

  15. “What about the meaningless catchphrase “I believe in America””

    Meaningless catchphrases are hardly an atypical characteristic among candidates for electoral office.

    Comment by Ortvin Sarapuu — July 14, 2016 @ 8:09 pm

  16. Ah, Wilkie. Never held prior political office, businessman, late switch from Democrat to Republican…. I guess history repeats itself.

    Comment by blairmulholland — July 17, 2016 @ 3:56 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: